Courses for Fall 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
EEUR 009-401 Intro To Russia and Eurasia: Histories, Cultures, Societies Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is designed as a broad introduction to the study of Russia and Eurasia that will offer students a multi-disciplinary overview of the cultures, histories and societies of this large and diverse region of the world. It is organized in units that illustrate the approaches of various disciplines to the study of the region, including history, literary studies, cinema studies, art history, and social scientific inquiry. At the conclusion of the course, students will be acquainted with these various disciplinary frameworks and the differences between them, with the modes of analysis and writing that pertain to them, and with fundamental knowledge of the region. They will be prepared for further study of the region in a variety of programs of study, including the Russian and East European Studies major, for which the course serves as a foundation. RUSS010401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
EEUR 026-401 Behind the Iron Curtain Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM RUSS026401, ANTH026401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Freshman Seminar</span>
EEUR 121-680 Elementary Hungarian I Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 07:00 PM-09:00 PM The elementary Hungarian I course focuses on providing reading, writing, listening and reading-comprehension skills on basic level Hungarian. Interactive class activities and authentic Hungarian material will enable students to develop language skills so they could talk about themselves and their families, discuss every day and weekend routines, express likes and dislikes, converse about school and family activities, and get acquainted with Hungarian holidays and cultural traditions. I
EEUR 123-680 Intermediate Hungarian I Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM The Intermediate Hungarian I course builds on and continues the course material in Elementary Hungarian I-II. Course activities, authentic audio and video material along with Hungarian online resources will enable students to further develop their reading, writing, listening comprehension and conversational skills. Students will practice their skills by discussing and writing about their interests, student lives, travel and cultural experiences, life on campus as well as learning about Hungarian seasonal traditions, cultural events, and Hungarian student life. I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
EEUR 123-681 Intermediate Hungarian I Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 05:30 PM-07:00 PM The Intermediate Hungarian I course builds on and continues the course material in Elementary Hungarian I-II. Course activities, authentic audio and video material along with Hungarian online resources will enable students to further develop their reading, writing, listening comprehension and conversational skills. Students will practice their skills by discussing and writing about their interests, student lives, travel and cultural experiences, life on campus as well as learning about Hungarian seasonal traditions, cultural events, and Hungarian student life. I
EEUR 135-401 Cold War: Global History Benjamin Nathans MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The Cold War was more than simply a military confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union; it was the frame within which the entire world developed (for better or worse) for nearly five decades. This course will examine the cold War as a global phenomenon, covering not only the military and diplomatic history of the period, but also examining the social and cultural impact of the superpower confrontation. We will cover the origins of the conflict, the interplay between periods of tension and detente, the relative significance of disagreements within the opposing blocs, and the relationship between the "center" of the conflict in the North Atlantic/European area and the global "periphery". RUSS135401, HIST135401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=EEUR135401
EEUR 153-401 Communism Mitchell A. Orenstein MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism. PSCI144401, RUSS134401 S
EEUR 160-401 Sex and Socialism Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights." GSWS160401, RUSS160401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=EEUR160401
EEUR 164-401 Russian and East European Film From the October Revolution To World War II Vladislav T. Todorov MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course presents the Russian contribution to world cinema before WWII - nationalization of the film industry in post revolutionary Russia, the creation of institutions of higher education in filmmaking, film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and the social and political reflex of cinema. Major themes and issues involve: the invention of montage, Kuleshov effect, the means of visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state. Great filmmaker and theorist in discussion include Vertov, Kuleshov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Medvedkin and others. CIMS164401, RUSS164401
RUSS 001-001 Elementary Russian I Djamilia Nazyrova MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, the Internet, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read simplified literary, commercial, and other types of texts (signs, menus, short news articles, short stories) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes). I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
RUSS 001-002 Elementary Russian I Maria M. Alley MWF 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-11:30 AM
This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, the Internet, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read simplified literary, commercial, and other types of texts (signs, menus, short news articles, short stories) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes). I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
RUSS 001-680 Elementary Russian I Lada Vassilieva TR 06:00 PM-08:30 PM This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, the Internet, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read simplified literary, commercial, and other types of texts (signs, menus, short news articles, short stories) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes). I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
RUSS 003-001 Intermediate Russian I Maria M. Alley MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills and their understanding of Russian culture. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 003-002 Intermediate Russian I Molly Peeney MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM
TR 10:30 AM-11:30 AM
This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills and their understanding of Russian culture. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 010-401 Intro To Russia and Eurasia: Histories, Cultures, Societies Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is designed as a broad introduction to the study of Russia and Eurasia that will offer students a multi-disciplinary overview of the cultures, histories and societies of this large and diverse region of the world. It is organized in units that illustrate the approaches of various disciplines to the study of the region, including history, literary studies, cinema studies, art history, and social scientific inquiry. At the conclusion of the course, students will be acquainted with these various disciplinary frameworks and the differences between them, with the modes of analysis and writing that pertain to them, and with fundamental knowledge of the region. They will be prepared for further study of the region in a variety of programs of study, including the Russian and East European Studies major, for which the course serves as a foundation. EEUR009401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 026-401 Behind the Iron Curtain Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This first-year seminar provides an introduction to the histories, cultures, and societies of Central and Eastern Europe, including Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, and the successor states of Yugoslavia. Through a selection of articles and essays written by anthropologists and sociologists and based on their extended fieldwork in the region, students will explore both the ethnographic method and the experience of everyday life during and after the communist era. Topics will include: popular music under socialism, food and wine, environmental concerns, the status of Muslim minorities, socialist aesthetics, public memory and cultures of commemoration, privatization, advertising, women's rights, gender and sexuality, emergent nationalisms, and the rise of income inequality and homelessness. All readings and assignments in English. EEUR026401, ANTH026401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Freshman Seminar</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 111-401 Poetics of Screenplay: the Art of Plotting Vladislav T. Todorov MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course studies screenwriting in a historical, theoretical and artistic perspective. We discuss the rules of drama and dialogue, character development, stage vs. screen-writing, adaptation of nondramatic works, remaking of plots, auteur vs. genre theory of cinema, storytelling in silent and sound films, the evolvement of a script in the production process, script doctoring, as well as screenwriting techniques and tools. COML118401, CIMS111401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 134-401 Communism Mitchell A. Orenstein MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism. PSCI144401, EEUR153401 S <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 135-401 Cold War: Global History Benjamin Nathans MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The Cold War was more than simply a military confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union; it was the frame within which the entire world developed (for better or worse) for nearly five decades. This course will examine the cold War as a global phenomenon, covering not only the military and diplomatic history of the period, but also examining the social and cultural impact of the superpower confrontation. We will cover the origins of the conflict, the interplay between periods of tension and detente, the relative significance of disagreements within the opposing blocs, and the relationship between the "center" of the conflict in the North Atlantic/European area and the global "periphery". HIST135401, EEUR135401 O <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=RUSS135401
RUSS 145-001 Masterpieces of 19th Century Russian Literature TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM A bronze monument to an all-powerful emperor comes to life and pursues a poor everyman through the streets, driving him to his death. A studious young man kills an old woman as a philosophical experiment. A young woman at the height of aristocratic society abandons her husband and young son to devote herself to her lover. These and other tales from the classics of nineteenth-century Russian literature will touch and delight you, get under your skin, and even attempt to show you how to live. We will read these tales in order to understand how books can become events in their own right, how Russian literature gained such power and prestige, and what it can still teach us today. Works will include Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman, Turgenev's Fathers and Children, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Khvoshchinskaya's City Folk and Country Folk, Chekhov's Cherry Orchard, and others. A <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 160-401 Sex and Socialism Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights." GSWS160401, EEUR160401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=RUSS160401
RUSS 164-401 Russian and East European Film From the October Revolution To World War II Vladislav T. Todorov MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM The purpose of this course is to present the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema in terms of film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and social and political reflex. We discuss major themes and issues such as the invention of montage, the means of revolutionary visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology, and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state in Soviet Russia before World War II. CIMS164401, EEUR164401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 189-001 Soviet & Post-Sov Econ Alexander Vekker TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The course will cover the development and operation of the Soviet centrally planned economy--one of the grandest social experiments of the 20th century. We will review the mechanisms of plan creation, the push for the collectivization and further development of Soviet agriculture, the role of the Soviet educational system and the performance of labor markets (including forced labor camps--GULags). We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Soviet system and the causes of its collapse. Privatization, called by some "piratization," will be one of the central issues in our consideration of the transition from central planning to a market economy in the early 1990s. Even though our main focus will be on the Soviet economy and post-Soviet transition, we will occasionally look back in time to the tsarist era and even further back to find evidence to help explain Soviet/Russian economic development. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 220-401 Russia and the West MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course will explore the representations of the West in eighteenth- and nineteenth- century Russian literature and philosophy. We will consider the Russian visions of various events and aspects of Western political and social life Revolutions, educational system, public executions, resorts, etc. within the context of Russian intellectual history. We will examine how images of the West reflect Russia's own cultural concerns, anticipations, and biases, as well as aesthetic preoccupations and interests of Russian writers. The discussion will include literary works by Karamzin, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Leskov, and Tolstoy, as well as non-fictional documents, such as travelers' letters, diaries, and historiosophical treatises of Russian Freemasons, Romantic and Positivist thinkers, and Russian social philosophers of the late Nineteenth century. A basic knowledge of nineteenth-century European history is desirable. The class will consist of lectures, discussion, short writing assignments, and two in-class tests. HIST220401, COML220401 O <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span>
RUSS 311-401 Advanced Russ Conv/Comp Molly Peeney TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course develops students' skills in speaking and writing about topics in Russian literature, contemporary society, politics, and everyday life. Topics include women, work and family; sexuality; the economic situation; environmental problems; and life values. Materials include selected short stories by 19th and 20th century Russian authors, video-clips of interviews, excerpts from films, and articles from the Russian media. Continued work on grammar and vocabulary building. RUSS511401 Q <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 360-001 Russian For Heritage Speakers I Djamilia Nazyrova MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to achieve proficiency in the language. Topics will include an intensive introduction to the Russian writing system and grammar, focusing on exciting materials and examples drawn from classic and contemporary Russian culture and social life. Students who complete this course in combination with RUSS361 satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 420-301 Contemp Russ Thrgh Film Maria V. Bourlatskaya TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course continues developing students' advanced skills in Russian and offers intensive study of Russian film, arguably the most powerful medium for reflecting changes in modern society. This course will examine Russia's transition to democracy and market economy through the eyes of its most creative and controversial cinematographers. The course will focus on the often agonizing process of changing values and attitudes as the country moves from Soviet to Post-Soviet society. Russian films with English subtitles will be supplemented by readings from contemporary Russian media sources. The course provides an excellent visual introduction to the problems of contemporary Russia society. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 474-301 Anton Chekhov: Love and Death in Russian Culture Djamilia Nazyrova TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 511-401 Advanced Russ Conv/Comp Molly Peeney TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course develops students' skills in speaking and writing about topics in Russian literature, contemporary society, politics, and everyday life. Topics include women, work and family; sexuality; the economic situation; environmental problems; and life values. Materials include selected short stories by 19th and 20th century Russian authors, video-clips of interviews, excerpts from films, and articles from the Russian media. Continued work on grammar and vocabulary building. RUSS311401 Q <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 518-401 Old Church Slavonic: History, Language, Manuscripts Julia Verkholantsev W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM The language that we know today as Old Church Slavonic (OCS) was invented, along with the Slavic alphabet(s), in the 9th century by two Greek scholars, Sts. Cyril and Methodius. They had been tasked by the Byzantine Emperor with bringing the Christian faith to the Slavic-speaking people of Great Moravia, a powerful medieval state in Central Europe. From there, literacy, along with the Christian faith, spread to other Slavs. OCS is thus the language of the oldest written texts of the Slavic-speaking world, which today is comprised of the following languages: Belarusian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Russian, Polish, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, and Ukrainian. Therefore, knowledge of OCS aids in understanding the cultural, literary, and linguistic history of any modern Slavic language. For learners of Russian and other Slavic languages, OCS provides a layer of elevated stylistic vocabulary and conceptual terminology, similar to, and even greater than, the role of Latin and Greek roots in the English language. For historical linguists, OCS provides valuable material for comparison with other ancient Indo-European languages, such as Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit. This course introduces students to the basics of OCS, as well as to the cultural and historical circumstances of the emergence of Slavic literacy and its material culture - manuscripts. It is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students. No prior knowledge of a Slavic language is necessary. COML518401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">No Prior Language Experience Required</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2018C&course=RUSS518401
RUSS 575-640 Russian History in Film Vladislav T. Todorov R 06:00 PM-08:00 PM The course draws on the cinematic/fictional representation of the Russian/Soviet history based on Russian as well as non-Russian sources. The analysis targets major modes of imagining, staging and reenacting history, construction of images that satisfy dominant political, cultural and ideological stereotypes, and help create national identities. Bias, eye-witness accounts, propaganda uses and abuses of history, forgeries and the production of alt-facts become topics of particular interest. The discussions involve nation builders, iconic heroes and charismatic antiheroes, great commanders and revolutionaries such as Alexander Nevsky, Ivan the Terrible, Rasputin and the Fall of the Romanovs, Lenin and the October Revolution, Stalin and the construction of the Soviet Colossus, the Storming of the Winter Palace, the Civil War, the Great Purge, the Red Scare in the US, etc. CIMS575640 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Online Course Only</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Only Open To LPS Students</span>
SLAV 390-680 Serbo-Croat-Bosnian I Neda Scepanovic-Uliano TR 06:30 PM-08:30 PM The course level is basic, starting with the alphabet (both versions of it, the Latin and the Cyrillic), moving on to the grammar basics, then some communication and other forms of interaction. I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
SLAV 500-401 History Lit Theory Jean-Michel Rabate W 09:00 AM-12:00 PM Over the last three decades, the fields of literary and cultural studies have been reconfigured by a variety of theoretical and methodological developments. Bracing and often confrontational dialogues between theoretical and political positions as varied as Deconstruction, New Historicism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Queer Theory, Minority Discourse Theory, Colonial and Post-colonial Studies and Cultural Studies have, in particular, altered disciplinary agendas and intellectual priorities for students embarking on the /professional /study of literature. In this course, we will study key texts, statements and debates that define these issues, and will work towards a broad knowledge of the complex rewriting of the project of literary studies in process today. The reading list will keep in mind the Examination List in Comparative Literature we will not work towards complete coverage but will ask how crucial contemporary theorists engage with the longer history and institutional practices of literary criticism. There will be no examinations. Students will make one class presentation, which will then be reworked into a paper (1200-1500 words) to be submitted one week after the presentation. A second paper will be an annotated bibliography on a theoretical issue or issues that a student wishes to explore further. The bibliography will be developed in consultation with the instructor; it will typically include three or four books and six to eight articles or their equivalent. The annotated bibliography will be prefaced by a five or six page introduction; the whole will add up to between 5000 and 6000 words of prose. Students will prepare position notes each week, which will either be posted on a weblog or circulated in class. CLST511401, GRMN534401, COML501401, ENGL601401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span>
SLAV 501-680 Elementary Polish I Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM This course is for students who want to acquire the linguistic skills necessary for communication in everyday situations and that would constitute a solid base for further study of the Polish language. In addition students will become acquainted with various aspects of Polish culture (including Polish films), history and contemporary affairs. Students will learn through classroom exercises based on a modern textbook, completion of individual and group assignments and work with various audio and video materials. The textbook Hurra - Po Polsku 1 is written in the spirit of the communicative approach, which makes it possible to communicate from the very beginning of the learning process. The special attention, however, will be paid on systematic development of all language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. I
SLAV 505-680 Polish/Heritage Speak I Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM The course is addressed to students who have spoken Polish at home and seek to achieve proficiency in the language. The main goal of this course is to provide instruction directed at students continued development of existing competencies in the Polish language. Students will acquire skills that range from learning grammar and spelling, and developing vocabulary, to interpretation and analysis of different literary genres. Students will explore a broad variety of cultural themes. Topics will include: Polish literature - classic and modern, social life, contemporary affairs and films. Upon completion of the Polish for Heritage Speakers course, students are expected to confidently understand, read, write and speak Polish with an increased vocabulary and a better command of Polish grammar. They will increase their reading skills through interpretation and analysis of different Polish literary genres. Students will be able to organize their thoughts and write in a coherent manner. They will increase their writing skills by writing personal essays, compositions and others. Students will further their knowledge of the Polish language and will engage in class discussion on various topics. Students will gain a better understanding of the Polish culture. I
SLAV 530-680 Elementary Czech I MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM An introduction to the fundamentals of the Czech language, acquisition of conversational, reading and writing skills. I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
SLAV 590-680 Elementary Ukrainian Leo D. Rudnytzky MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM An introduction to the fundamentals of the Ukrainian language, acquisition of conversational, reading and writing skills. This course is designed for students who have no or little background in studying Ukrainian. Students will be able to develop the base for the further study of the Ukrainian language. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Ukrainian language and culture for those who would like to speak Ukrainian or use the language for reading and research. The course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing). I
SLAV 592-680 Intermed Ukrainian I Leo D. Rudnytzky MW 03:00 PM-04:30 PM This is a first-semester intermediate-level Ukrainian language course which is designed to make students practice reading, speaking and writing in Ukrainian. Current issues of Ukrainian newspapers, especially the weekly , will serve as the basic source for the study of the contemporary Ukrainian idiom. Reading, translation and discussion of featured articles on such topics as business, education, politics, science, sports et al. including advertising and horoscope style and terminology will not only be used to hone the language skills and build up vocabulary but also to acquaint the student with the latest linguistic developments in Ukraine, such as the loan-words and loan-translations, abbreviations and acronyms, ancient folk proverbs and sayings as well as contemporary technical terms. I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
SLAV 653-401 Russ Sov Cultural Insts Kevin M.F. Platt R 02:00 PM-05:00 PM Course is topical. Please see department for most recent description. COML653401, ENGL591401, HIST620401