Courses for Spring 2022

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
CZCH 120-680 Czech - Short Stories Abigail Weil MW 05:15 PM-07:15 PM A conversational Czech language course integrated with an introduction to Czech short fiction. The selection of texts can be tailored to suit students' interests. All texts will be available in English translation; students with advance knowledge may choose to read in the original. Through examples of short fiction, students will be introduced to important Czech authors such as Alois Jirasek, Jan Neruda, Bozena Nemcova, Karel Capek, Jaroslav Hasek, Eva Kanturkova, Daniela Fischerova, and Daniela Hodrova. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
HUNG 122-680 Elementary Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM Continuation of EEUR121. The second semester of elementary Hungarian course continues on providing functional language competency in basic grammar, vocabulary, comprehension, reading, writing and speaking in Hungarian. Students will continue to learn communicating in everyday life situations as well as in organizing a trip to Hungary, staying in a hotel, ordering meals, buying goods, and participating in cultural activities by using authentic Hungarian online resources and interactive class activities. Prerequisite: Offered through Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required
HUNG 124-680 Intermed Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM The intermediate Hungarian II course continues EEUR123. Class documents and activities enable students to develop functional intermediate Hungarian competency by exploring Hungary and its culture, reading authentic online news sources, practicing listening and comprehension skills via video and audio material, researching cultural events and traditions, and exploring Hungarians' everyday lives. At the end of the semester, students will be able to participate and pass their Oral Competency Exit Interview on intermediate level and discuss topics, such as student life, family, friends, academic and student life activities/interests, travel, shopping, and cultural events. Prerequisite: Offered through Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required
HUNG 124-681 Intermed Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei MW 07:00 PM-08:30 PM The intermediate Hungarian II course continues EEUR123. Class documents and activities enable students to develop functional intermediate Hungarian competency by exploring Hungary and its culture, reading authentic online news sources, practicing listening and comprehension skills via video and audio material, researching cultural events and traditions, and exploring Hungarians' everyday lives. At the end of the semester, students will be able to participate and pass their Oral Competency Exit Interview on intermediate level and discuss topics, such as student life, family, friends, academic and student life activities/interests, travel, shopping, and cultural events. Prerequisite: Offered through Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required
PLSH 502-680 Elementary Polish II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM This course is a continuation of the PLSH 501. This is for students who want to acquire the linguistic skills necessary for communication in everyday situations and that would constitute a solid base for further study of the Polish language. In addition students will become acquainted with various aspects of Polish culture (including Polish films), history and contemporary affairs. Students will learn through classroom exercises based on a modern textbook, completion of individual and group assignments and work with various audio and video materials. The textbook Hurra - Po Polsku 1 is written in the spirit of the communicative approach, which makes it possible to communicate from the very beginning of the learning process. The special attention, however, will be paid on systematic development of all language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center.
PLSH 506-680 Polish/Heritage Speak II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM Continuation of PLSH 505. The course is addressed to students who have spoken Polish at home and seek to achieve proficiency in the language. The main goal of this course is to provide instruction directed at students continued development of existing competencies in the Polish language. Students will acquire skills that range from learning grammar and spelling, and developing vocabulary, to interpretation and analysis of different literary genres. Students will explore a broad variety of cultural themes. Topics will include: Polish literature - classic and modern, social life, contemporary affairs and films.
REES 010-401 Central & Eastern Europe: Cultures, Histories, Societies Kristen R Ghodsee TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region - its cultures, histories, and societies - from the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and sub-regions, such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through an individual research paper and class presentations. Prerequisite: This course is one of two required core courses for the Russian and East European Studies (REES) major. COML010401 All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 113-401 Portraits of Old Russia: Myth, Icon, Chronicle Julia Verkholantsev MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course covers eight centuries of Russias cultural, political, and social history, from its origins through the eighteenth century, a period which laid the foundation for the Russian Empire. Each week-long unit is organized around a set of texts (literary text, historical document, image, film) which examine prominent historical and legendary figures as they represent chapters in Russias history. Historical figures under examination include, among others, the Baptizer of Rus, Prince Vladimir; the nation-builder, Prince Alexander Nevsky; the first Russian Tsar, Ivan the Terrible; the first Emperor and Westernizer, Peter the Great; the renowned icon painter Andrei Rublev; the epic hero Ilya Muromets; and the founder of Muscovite monasticism, St. Three modern-day nation-states Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus share and dispute the cultural heritage of Old Rus, and their political relationships even today revolve around interpretations of the past. This constructed past has a continuing influence in modern Russia and is keenly referenced, sometimes manipulatively, in contemporary social and political discourse. (Recently, for example, President Putin has justified the annexation of Crimea to Russia by referring to it as the holy site of Prince Vladimirs baptism, from which Russian Christianity ostensibly originates.) The study of pre-modern cultural and political history explains many aspects of modern Russian society, as well as certain political aspirations of its leaders. COML131401, HIST045401, REES613401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 136-401 Portraits of Russian Society: Art, Fiction, Drama Molly Peeney TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course covers 19C Russian cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a single medium-length text (novella, play, memoir) which opens up a single scene of social history birth, death, duel, courtship, tsar, and so on. Each of these main texts is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials paintings, historical readings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. The object of the course is to understand the social codes and rituals that informed nineteenth-century Russian life, and to apply this knowledge in interpreting literary texts, other cultural objects, and even historical and social documents (letters, memoranda, etc.). We will attempt to understand social history and literary interpretation as separate disciplines yet also as disciplines that can inform one another. In short: we will read the social history through the text, and read the text against the social history. HIST047401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) All Readings and Lectures in English
Humanities & Social Science Sector
REES 155-401 Masterpieces 20c Rus Lit Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM "Only in Russia is poetry respected. They kill you for it," famously quipped the poet Osip Mandelstam, who died in Joseph Stalin's concentration camps. Russia is a society that takes literature seriously--one in which the pen is assumed to have direct historical consequences. In this course, we will study how twentieth century Russian literature actively participated in war, revolution, totalitarian dictatorship, and resistance. The masterworks we will study open windows into worlds of revolutionary rapture, moral uplift in the face of tyranny, courageous subversion of the repressive state, and historical reflection on its failures. Our readings will range from an avant-garde play intended to rewire your mind, to an epic representation of revolutionary social transformation, to surreal and absurdist representations of a world gone mad. In other words: fasten your seatbelts low and tight across your waist; turbulence ahead! REES655401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 162-401 Anarchism Kristen R Ghodsee TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM "That we are Utopians is well known. So Utopian are we that we go the length of believing that the Revolution can and ought to assure shelter, food, and clothes to all..." -Pyotr Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread. Although born in the West through the works of William Godwin and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, anarchism as a political theory was subsequently developed by a variety of Russian and Ukrainian theorists and activists, including Mikhail Bakunin, Lev Tolstoy, Pyotr Kropotkin, Nestor Makhno, and Emma Goldman (in exile in the United States). Anarchism fundamentally questions the need for political power and authority, particularly as embodied in a state. As a political theory, anarchism makes moral claims about the importance of individual liberty and presents a positive theory of human flourishing that is based on ideals of non-coercive consensus building. This course investigates the 19th century theoretical foundations of Russian and Ukrainian anarchist theory through a close examination of key texts from the 19th and early 20th centuries and includes ethnographic explorations of anarchist practices in eastern Europe in the 21st century. All readings will be in English. REES662401, ANTH262401
REES 217-401 Russian Politics Rudra Sil MW 05:15 PM-06:15 PM This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a brief discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the Putin and post-Putin era. PSCI217401, PSCI517401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
REES 220-401 Russia and the West Siarhei Biareishyk TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course will explore the representations of the West in eighteenth- and nineteenth- century Russian literature and philosophy. We will consider the Russian visions of various events and aspects of Western political and social life Revolutions, educational system, public executions, resorts, etc. within the context of Russian intellectual history. We will examine how images of the West reflect Russia's own cultural concerns, anticipations, and biases, as well as aesthetic preoccupations and interests of Russian writers. The discussion will include literary works by Karamzin, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Leskov, and Tolstoy, as well as non-fictional documents, such as travelers' letters, diaries, and historiosophical treatises of Russian Freemasons, Romantic and Positivist thinkers, and Russian social philosophers of the late Nineteenth century. A basic knowledge of nineteenth-century European history is desirable. The class will consist of lectures, discussion, short writing assignments, and two in-class tests. COML220401, REES620401, HIST220401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Humanities & Social Science Sector
REES 229-401 National Antiquities Julia Verkholantsev MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Human societies have always wanted to know about their origins, the reasons for their customs, the foundations of their social institutions and religious beliefs, and the justification of their power structures. They have conceived of creation myths and of origins stories for their communities in order to position themselves within the past and present of the natural and human worlds. The newly Christianized kingdoms of Medieval Europe faced the challenge of securing a place in the new vision of universal Providential history, and they inscribed their own histories into the narratives they knew from the authoritative sources of the time - biblical genealogies and heroic stories inherited from the poets of classical antiquity. The deeds and virtues of saintly kings and church hierarchs provided a continuity of historical narrative on the sacred map of time and space. In the 19th century, while interest in medieval antiquity as a source of inspiration for political and cultural renewal brought about a critical study of evidence, it also effected reinterpretation and repurposing of this evidence vis-a-vis a new political concept - that of a nation. This seminar will focus on central, eastern and southeast European nations and explore three categories of "national antiquities" that have been prominent in the workings of their modern nationalisms: (1) stories of ethnogenesis (so-called, origo gentis) that narrate and explain the beginnings and genealogy of peoples and states, as they are recorded in medieval and early modern chronicles, (2) narratives about holy people, who are seen as national patron-saints, and (3) material objects of sacred significance (manuscripts, religious ceremony objects, crowns, icons) that act as symbols of political, cultural and national identities. Our approach will be two-fold: On the one hand, we will read medieval sources and ask the question of what they tell us about the mindset of the authors and societies that created them. We will think about how the knowledge of the past helped medieval societies legitimize the present and provide a model for the future. On the other hand, we will observe how medieval narratives and artifacts have been interpreted in modern times and how they became repurposed - first, during the "Romantic" stage of national awakening, then in the post-imperial era of independent nation-states, and, finally, in the post-Soviet context of reimagined Europe. We will observe how the study of nationalistic mentality enhances our understanding of how the past is represented and repurposed in scholarship and politics. COML229401, HIST263401 Benjamin Franklin Seminars
REES 240-401 Napoleonic Era & Tolstoy Peter I. Holquist TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM In this course we will read what many consider to be the greatest book in world literature. This work, Tolstoys War and Peace, is devoted to one of the most momentous periods in world history, the Napoleonic Era (1789-1815). We will study both the novel and the era of the Napoleonic Wars: the military campaigns of Napoleon and his opponents, the grand strategies of the age, political intrigues and diplomatic betrayals, the ideologies and human dramas, the relationship between art and history. How does literature help us to understand this era? How does history help us to understand this great novel? This semester marks the 200th anniversary of Napoleons attempt to conquer Russia and achieve world domination, the campaign of 1812. Come celebrate this Bicentennial with us! Because we will read War and Peace over the course of the entire semester, readings will be manageable and very enjoyable. HIST333401, COML236401
REES 269-401 Cinema and Socialism Julia Alekseyeva
Chenshu Zhou
M 12:00 PM-03:00 PM Films from socialist countries are often labeled and dismissed as "propaganda" in Western democratic societies. This course complicates this simplistic view, arguing for the value in understanding the ties between socialist governments, the cinematic arts, and everything in between. We will examine films from past and present socialist countries such as the Soviet Union, China, North Korea, and Cuba, as well as films made with socialist aspirations. As this course will argue, the formal features of socialist films cannot be understood without reference to how cinema as an institution is situated: both in relation to socialism as ideology, and the lived experiences of socialism. We will consider topics such as socialist cultural theory, film exhibition, and reception, tracing over 100 years of film history: from 1917 to the present day. This course connects different global traditions of socialism, as well as disparate global regions, arguing for a transnational and transhistorical connection that cuts against the grain of most North American cultural discourse. CIMS310401, ENGL310401, ARTH381401, EALC104401
REES 403-401 Russia in Xxi Century Aleksey Berg MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The goal of this course is to improve students' ability to engage in informed and articulate debate on a number of issues facing Russia and the world at large today, such as: political freedom, and the future of political protest, environmental problems and catastrophes and their aftermath (Chernobyl nuclear disaster), problems of social inequality and redistribution of wealth, national security, the economy, health care, international politics. This will be accomplished through intensive work on expanding lexical knowledge, increasing grammatical accuracy, and developing rhetorical skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend increasingly complex written and spoken texts on a range of topics and defend their own viewpoint in oral debate and persuasive essay formats. REES523401 Prior Language Experience Required
REES 501-640 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film Vladislav T. Todorov T 05:15 PM-07:15 PM This course studies political violence, terrorism, civil wars, ethnic conflicts, and genocidal policies as represented in the social media, cable news, documentaries, feature films. We discuss various techniques and strategies of the propaganda wars, post-truth media environment, etc. The regions of interest are Former Soviet Union, Russia, the Caucasus, and the Balkans, US homegrown political violence, and the Middle East. The students are expected to develop and demonstrate a critical approach to different aspects of the cinematic, news, and social media representation of ethnic conflict. We focus on the violent developments that took place in Russia and the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc, conditioned by the geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing both, the Eastern and the Western perspective. Course Online: Synchronous Format https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=REES501640
REES 503-301 Introduction To Rees II Kevin M.F. Platt T 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This course will provide an overview of humanistic approaches to the study of Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Weekly modules are divided into those focused on Methods, Moments, and Geographies (although these dimensions of scholarly work are of course all activated in each module), including: Methods 1: Disciplines - What are the Humanities? 2: Texts and Cultures: Close Reading 3: Images: Close Analysis 4: Institutions - Cultural and Social Institutions and Their Study 5: Histories and Archives 6: Data: The Digital Humanities Genres: 1. What are the main scholarly genres of humanities scholarship: Articles, reviews, and books. Geographies: 1: Caucasus 2: Russian and Soviet Empires 3: East and East Central Europe 4: Central Asia Moments: 1: Medieval-18C 2: 19C 3: 20C 4: 21C All readings will be provided in English, although students are encouraged to read in the original, if possible. Some originals will be provided in parallel to the translated English texts. Students will either complete an original research paper or a selection of smaller outputs (an oral report, an extended review essay, an annotated bibliography).
REES 523-401 Russia in Xxi Century Aleksey Berg MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The goal of this course is to improve students' ability to engage in informed and articulate debate on a number of issues facing Russia and the world at large today, such as: political freedom, and the future of political protest, environmental problems and catastrophes and their aftermath (Chernobyl nuclear disaster), problems of social inequality and redistribution of wealth, national security, the economy, health care, international politics. This will be accomplished through intensive work on expanding lexical knowledge, increasing grammatical accuracy, and developing rhetorical skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend increasingly complex written and spoken texts on a range of topics and defend their own viewpoint in oral debate and persuasive essay formats. REES403401 Prior Language Experience Required
REES 571-401 Post-Soc Gender & Health Ekaterina Borozdina R 08:30 AM-11:30 AM In terms of gender and health arrangements, post-socialist societies have provided through the course of their history examples both of radical empowerment and of evident discrimination, rapid emancipation and conservative backlashes. Social policy researchers frequently refer to this as a sui generis social laboratory, where health and gender policy experiments have taken place. This course aims to examine the premises and societal outcomes of such 'experiments' both on the empirical and conceptual levels. The course pursues two interconnected goals (1) to explore the specificities of gender and health in post-socialist societies, i.e. to consider how these phenomena are grounded in and affected by the political and institutional transition from state socialism; (2) to explore theoretical insights that social studies of the post-socialist experience provide for our understanding of health and gender. The course is structured thematically and chronologically. By tracing transformations of socialist and post-socialist gender order the first part of the course introduces students to the political and institutional context of societies under consideration. The second part of the course discusses social science categories that are used to analyze gender and health (medical professionalism, medical knowledge, emotions in healthcare, etc.) and examines, how attention to socialist and post-socialist experience can enhance our conceptualizations. The third part is devoted to different dimensions of health and gender inequalities on post-socialist space. Empirical researches discussed in this part are mostly concerned with the case of Russia, but are not limited to it. Generally, the course builds into the discussion on what analytical results can be gained through comparing health and gender in post-socialist and 'Western' contexts, and what variations between and within post-socialist societies exist. This is an introductory level graduate course. SOCI571401
REES 613-401 Portraits of Old Russia Julia Verkholantsev MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM COML131401, HIST045401, REES113401
REES 620-401 Russia and the West Siarhei Biareishyk TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course will explore the representations of the West in eighteenth- and nineteenth- century Russian literature and philosophy. We will consider the Russian visions of various events and aspects of Western political and social life Revolutions, educational system, public executions, resorts, etc. within the context of Russian intellectual history. We will examine how images of the West reflect Russia's own cultural concerns, anticipations, and biases, as well as aesthetic preoccupations and interests of Russian writers. The discussion will include literary works by Karamzin, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Leskov, and Tolstoy, as well as non-fictional documents, such as travelers' letters, diaries, and historiosophical treatises of Russian Freemasons, Romantic and Positivist thinkers, and Russian social philosophers of the late Nineteenth century. A basic knowledge of nineteenth-century European history is desirable. The class will consist of lectures, discussion, short writing assignments, and two in-class tests. REES220401, COML220401, HIST220401
REES 653-301 Environmental History of Central Eurasia W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Course is topical. Please see department for most recent description. Undergraduates Need Permission
REES 655-401 Masterpieces 20c Rus Lit Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM "Only in Russia is poetry respected. They kill you for it," famously quipped the poet Osip Mandelstam, who died in Joseph Stalin's concentration camps. Russia is a society that takes literature seriously - one in which the pen is assumed to have direct historical consequences. In this course, we will study how twentieth century Russian literature actively participated in war, revolution, totalitarian dictatorship, and resistance. The masterworks we will study open windows into worlds of revolutionary rapture, moral uplift in the face of tyranny, courageous subversion of the repressive state, and historical reflection on its failures. Our readings will range from an avant-garde play intended to rewire your mind, to an epic representation of revolutionary social transformation, to surreal and absurdist representations of a world gone mad. In other words: fasten your seatbelts low and tight across your waist; turbulence ahead! REES155401
REES 662-401 Anarchism Kristen R Ghodsee TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM "That we are Utopians is well known. So Utopian are we that we go the length of believing that the Revolution can and ought to assure shelter, food, and clothes to all..." -Pyotr Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread. Although born in the West through the works of William Godwin and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, anarchism as a political theory was subsequently developed by a variety of Russian and Ukrainian theorists and activists, including Mikhail Bakunin, Lev Tolstoy, Pyotr Kropotkin, Nestor Makhno, and Emma Goldman (in exile in the United States). Anarchism fundamentally questions the need for political power and authority, particularly as embodied in a state. As a political theory, anarchism makes moral claims about the importance of individual liberty and presents a positive theory of human flourishing that is based on ideals of non-coercive consensus building. This course investigates the 19th century theoretical foundations of Russian and Ukrainian anarchist theory through a close examination of key texts from the 19th and early 20th centuries and includes ethnographic explorations of anarchist practices in eastern Europe in the 21st century. All readings will be in English. REES162401, ANTH262401
RUSS 002-401 Elementary Russian II Maria Alley MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS502401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 002-680 Elementary Russian II Lada Vassilieva TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS502680 Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 004-401 Intermediate Russian II Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of RUSS003. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS504401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 105-401 Accelerated Elem Russian Djamilia Nazyrova MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:30 PM TWO IN ONE: This is an intensive two-credit course covering two semesters of the first-year sequence (RUSS001 and 002). The course is designed for students with no background in Russian and develops language competence in speaking, reading, writing and understanding contemporary Russian. Class work emphasizes development of communication skills and cultural awareness. Together with RUSS003 and 004 fulfills Penn Language Requirement. RUSS505401
RUSS 312-401 Advanced Conv/Comp II Maria Alley TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS512401 Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 312-402 Advanced Conv/Comp II Aleksey Berg MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS512402 Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 361-001 Russ Heritage Speakers 2 Djamilia Nazyrova MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is a continuation of RUSS360. In some cases, students who did not take RUSS360 but have basic reading and writing skills may be permitted to enroll with the instructor's permission. Students who complete RUSS361 with a passing grade will satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 502-401 Elementary Russian II Maria Alley MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Continuation of RUSS501. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS002401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 502-680 Elementary Russian II Lada Vassilieva TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM Continuation of RUSS501. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS002680
RUSS 504-401 Intermediate Russian II Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of RUSS503. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS004401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
RUSS 505-401 Accelerated Elem Russian Djamilia Nazyrova MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:30 PM TWO IN ONE: This is an intensive two-credit course covering two semesters of the first-year sequence (RUSS001 and 002). The course is designed for students with no background in Russian and develops language competence in speaking, reading, writing and understanding contemporary Russian. Class work emphasizes development of communication skills and cultural awareness. Together with RUSS003 and 004 fulfills Penn Language Requirement. RUSS105401
RUSS 508-301 Adv Russian For Business Maria Bourlatskaya MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This advanced language course focuses on developing effective oral and written communication skills for working in a Russian-speaking business environment. Students will discuss major aspects of Russian business today and learn about various Russian companies using material from the current Russian business press. In addition, students will be engaged in a number of creative projects, such as business negotiation simulations, and simulation of creating a company in Russia. Prerequisite: At lease one RUSS 400-level course or comparable language competence. Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 512-401 Advanced Conv/Comp II Maria Alley TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS312401 Permission Needed From Department
RUSS 512-402 Advanced Conv/Comp II Aleksey Berg MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS312402
UKRN 591-680 Elementary Ukrainian II Kseniia Power TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM Continuation of SLAV 590. During the second semester, the students The grammar part of the course will be mostly focused on the Ukrainian nouns and the cases, students will learn and practice each case in the context of the real-life situations. In addition, students will become acquainted with various aspects of Ukrainian culture and traditions with the special focus on the festive customs (i.e. Christmas and Easter culture in Ukraine). The course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing) and is a solid foundation for learning Ukrainian in future. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center.
UKRN 593-680 Intermed Ukrainian II Kseniia Power TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This second-semester intermediate-level Ukrainian language is the continuation of the SLAV 592. Students will be able to practice reading, listening, writing and speaking Ukrainian more in the context of Ukrainian history politics, and culture. Students will be provided with the newspapers in Ukrainian and other authentic materials that will be the basis of both the classroom discussions and homework. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center.