Courses for Fall 2022

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
BCS 0100-680 Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian I MW 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is the first in the series of first-year courses, intended for students with no previous background in Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian languages. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary BCS. At the end of the course students will be comfortable using both Latin and Cyrillic versions of the alphabet and will be able to read simple texts, including signs, menus, short news articles, and short stories. Class work emphasizes development of communicative and cultural competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in BCS. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in BSC on topics concerning your daily life. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in BCS.
CZCH 0010-680 Czech Through Film Abigail Weil MW 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course has two separate but related components: a series of Czech films, shown with subtitles and open to the entire University of Pennsylvania community, and a Czech language class which relies on the films for content. Each film screening will be preceded by introductory remarks and followed by a discussion, with optional reading material made available in advance. In this way, the film series can but need not also be offered as a for-credit course, cross-listed through REES and Cinema and Media Studies. The films will be sequenced chronologically through Czech history, as opposed to film history, so that the series will double as a survey of Czech history. For example, we will begin with films set in the medieval period, such as Marketa Lazarova (dir. Frantisek Vlacil, 1967) and Cisaruv pekar-Pekaruv cisar (Emperor's Baker-Baker's Emperor, dir. Martin Fric, 1955). Eventually we will progress to recent films that deal with the current moment. Classic and contemporary films will be intermingled to simultaneously present a variety of important historical eras and cinematic techniques. Concurrently, students enrolled in the language course will learn basic Czech using custom-made materials drawn from the films. As their vocabulary and grasp of grammatical concepts increases, we will be able to work with longer and more complex sections of the film-texts. The films will provide the material for listening and reading exercises, and the students' oral and written work will be anchored by their responses to the films. We will advance from picking out simple statements to analyzing dialogue and identifying irony in film and composition, developing skills of intercultural communication and competence. By the end of the course, students will be able to read about Czech cinema using authentic materials, and discuss the films' aesthetic, historical and political importance.
HUNG 0100-680 Hungarian I Adrienn V Mizsei TR 7:00 PM-8:59 PM This course is the first in a series of first-year courses, intended for students with no previous background in Hungarian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Hungarian. It will also introduce you to Hungarian culture through exciting authentic materials, including songs, videos, and short stories. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Hungarian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Hungarian on topics concerning your daily life, likes and dislikes, school, work and family, Hungarian holidays and holiday traditions. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Hungarian.
HUNG 0300-680 Hungarian III Adrienn V Mizsei MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is the first in a series of second-year courses, continuation of Hungarian II. The course will strengthen students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Hungarian and will expand students' active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Hungarian culture through exciting authentic materials, including songs, videos, and short stories. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Hungarian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Hungarian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, your interests and life on campus, travel and cultural experiences, Hungarian seasonal traditions and cultural events. You will also be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts.
HUNG 0300-681 Hungarian III Adrienn V Mizsei MW 7:00 PM-8:29 PM This course is the first in a series of second-year courses, continuation of Hungarian II. The course will strengthen students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Hungarian and will expand students' active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Hungarian culture through exciting authentic materials, including songs, videos, and short stories. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Hungarian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Hungarian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, your interests and life on campus, travel and cultural experiences, Hungarian seasonal traditions and cultural events. You will also be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts.
PLSH 0100-680 Polish I Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 7:00 PM-8:59 PM This course is the first in a series of first-year courses, intended for students with no previous background in Polish. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Polish. It will also introduce you to Polish culture through exciting authentic materials, Polish films, history and contemporary affairs. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Polish. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Polish on topics concerning your daily life. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Polish.
PLSH 0201-680 Polish for Heritage Speakers I Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This is the first in the series of literacy courses for students who have spoken Polish at home and seek to improve literacy skills and language competence. The course aims to enhance linguistic accuracy in spelling, grammar, word choice and pronunciation, as well as fluency and narrative structure in both speaking and writing. We will also focus on developing effective reading and listening strategies and expanding students’ active and passive vocabulary through interpretation and analysis of various literary genres and a broad variety of cultural themes.
REES 0010-001 Central and Eastern Europe: Cultures, Histories, Societies Kristen R Ghodsee TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region - its cultures, histories, and societies - from the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and sub-regions, such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through an individual research paper and class presentations. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=REES0010001
REES 0100-401 Portraits of Old Rus: Myth, Icon, Chronicle Julia Verkholantsev MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Three modern-day nation-states – Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus – share and dispute the cultural heritage of Old Rus, and their political relationships revolve around interpretations of the past. Has the medieval Rus state been established by the Vikings or by the local Slavs? Is early Rus a mother state of Russia or of Ukraine, and, therefore, should it be spelled ‘Kyivan Rus,’ or ‘Kievan Rus’ in English? Has the culture of Russian political despotism been inherited from the Mongols, or is it an autochthonous ideology? The constructed past has a continuing importance in modern Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, and it is keenly referenced, often manipulatively, in contemporary social and political discourse. For example, President Putin invaded Ukraine under a pretense that its territory has “always” been an integral part of Russia and its history. The course covers eight centuries of cultural, political, and social history of the lands that are now within the borders of Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, from early historical records through the 18th century, a period that laid the foundation for the Russian Empire and the formation of modern nations. Students gain knowledge about formative events and prominent figures, as well as social and cultural developments during this period. The course takes multidisciplinary approach by combining the study of textual sources, objects of art and architecture, music, ritual, and film in their social and historical contexts. Students learn to analyze and interpret primary sources (historical documents and literary texts), identify their intellectual issues, and understand the historical, cultural, and social contexts in which these sources emerged. While working with these primary sources students learn to pose questions about their value and reliability as historical evidence. By exposing students to the critical examination of “the uses of the past,” the course aims to teach them to appreciate the authoritative nature of historical interpretation and its practical application in contemporary social and political rhetoric. The study of pre-modern cultural and political history through the prism of nationalism theories explains many aspects of modern Belarusian, Russian, and Ukrainian societies, as well as political aspirations of their leaders. At the end of the course, students should develop understanding of the continuity and change in the history of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, their belief systems, and nationalistic ideologies, and will be able to speak and write about these issues with competence and confidence. HIST0724401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes)
REES 0130-401 Portraits of Soviet Society: Literature, Film, Drama Siarhei Biareishyk MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM How can art and literature open a window on Russian lives lived over the course of the tumultuous twentieth century? This course adopts a unique approach to questions of cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a medium-length film, text or set of texts by some of the most important cultural figures of the era (novella, play, memoir, film, short stories) which opens up a single scene of social history: work, village, avant-garde, war, Gulag, and so on. Each cultural work is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials: historical readings, paintings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. We will read social history through culture and culture through history. HIST0825401, REES6130401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
REES 0131-401 Putin's Russia: Culture, Society and History Mitchell Orenstein TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Winston Churchill famously said that Russia "is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." Strikingly, today many informed Russians would agree: no one can provide definitive answers concerning what has driven Russian public life and politics over the past decade, as it ricochetted from the mass protests of 2011 and 2012, into the Pussy Riot scandal, then the intense patriotism that drove the Russian annexation of Crimea and intervention in Ukraine. In this course we will examine how Russians themselves communicate about and represent Russia and what this reveals about this complex society and its development. We will consider print journalism, novels, films, televised media, and the internet, paying close attention both to particular representations and to social institutions for their production, dissemination and consumption. Topics of special concern will include: conspiracy theories, representations of Russian history, collective identity and patriotism, intellectuals and elites, gender and sexuality, consumption and wealth. Putin's Russia is an introductory level course for which no prior knowledge of Russian history, culture or society is required. All readings and screenings will be in English. REES6131401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
REES 0172-401 Madness and Madmen in Russian Culture Molly Peeney TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Is "insanity" today the same thing as "madness" of old? Who gets to define what it means to be "sane," and why? Are the causes of madness biological or social? In this course, we will grapple with these and similar questions while exploring Russia's fascinating history of madness as a means to maintain, critique, or subvert the status quo. We will consider the concept of madness in Russian culture beginning with its earliest folkloric roots and trace its depiction and function in the figure of the Russian "holy fool," in classical literature, and in contemporary film. Readings will include works by many Russian greats, such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov and Nabokov. COML1097401, REES6172401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
REES 0275-401 Montage and Revolution: Conceptual Cinema of Sergei Eisenstein Siarhei Biareishyk TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The 1917 Russian Revolution was to inaugurate a new epoch in human history. Working with and within this time of political and cultural upheaval, Sergei Eisenstein inaugurated a revolution in montage technique that would usher a new age of cinema, a new practice of art, and a new way of thinking in images. Eisenstein’s cinematic techniques aimed at producing concepts in the language of film. It also sought modes of expression inaccessible to discursive thought. Navigating a tenuous line between art and politics, Eisenstein's works explore the social and political power of affectivity and expressivity, and the cinematic potential for both representing and eliciting emotion in individual viewers and masses alike. In conversation with the tumultuous political and cultural shifts of the Soviet society from the revolutionary 1920s to the age of Stalinism and the World War II, this course will follow Eisenstein’s filmography, from his monumental reconstruction of the revolutionary Petersburg in October to the engagement with representations of history during the Stalinist era in Ivan the Terrible. We will engage with Eisenstein’s theoretical writings, his cartoons and sketches, public speeches, and his lost and unrealized projects, such as his collaboration with Hollywood and a plan to film Marx’s Capital. In this process, we will learn basic tenets of film and aesthetic theory, while practicing the analysis of film with attention to form and content. Following the lead of Eisenstein's artistic and theoretical production, we will engage with questions his work raises: How can cinematography elicit and manipulate the emotions of its viewer? What is expressivity? Can film represent philosophical concepts? What is cinema's relation to propaganda and politics? What is revolutionary about the medium of film, and what is film’s role in the revolution? No prior knowledge of Russian history, culture or society is required, nor is specialized knowledge of film history or film analysis. All readings will be in English and all films will be subtitled in English. CIMS0275401
REES 0310-401 The Rise and Fall of the Russian Empire, 1552-1917 Peter I Holquist MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM How and why did Russia become the center of the world's largest empire, a single state encompassing eleven time zones and over a hundred ethnic groups? To answer this question, we will explore the rise of a distinct political culture beginning in medieval Muscovy, its transformation under the impact of a prolonged encounter with European civilization, and the various attempts to re-form Russia from above and below prior to the Revolution of 1917. Main themes include the facade vs. the reality of central authority, the intersection of foreign and domestic issues, the development of a radical intelligentsia, and the tension between empire and nation. HIST0240401, HIST5240401, REES5310401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=HIST0240401
REES 0410-401 Masterpieces of 19th-Century Russian Literature Aleksey Berg TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM A bronze monument to an all-powerful emperor comes to life and pursues a poor everyman through the streets, driving him to his death. A studious young man kills an old woman as a philosophical experiment. A young woman at the height of aristocratic society abandons her husband and young son to devote herself to her lover. These and other tales from the classics of nineteenth-century Russian literature will touch and delight you, get under your skin, and even attempt to show you how to live. We will read these tales in order to understand how books can become events in their own right, how Russian literature gained such power and prestige, and what it can still teach us today. Authors include Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Pavlova, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. REES6410401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
REES 0481-401 Tolstoy D. Brian Kim TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Leo Tolstoy is a figure who arguably needs little introduction, if only as an effigy for the kind of author who writes books like "War and Peace" — prime examples of what Henry James called the “large, loose, baggy monsters” of nineteenth-century Russian literature, the sprawling novels with several parallel plot lines and hundreds of characters who inhabit page numbers in the quadruple digits. In this seminar, we will grapple together with the intricacies of "War and Peace," learn about the social, cultural, and historical contexts not only of its depiction and genesis, but also of its wide-ranging reception, and consider the big questions that preoccupied Tolstoy throughout his lifetime. Working with a range of his texts including a wide spread of his shorter fiction and also a number of Tolstoy’s non-literary writings on topics such as aesthetics, religion, education, and social and political problems, we will work toward understanding Tolstoy’s work, how he became who he was, and the reverberations of his thought throughout the rest of the world. COML2004401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=REES0481401
REES 0630-401 Behind the Iron Curtain Kristen R Ghodsee TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This first-year seminar provides an introduction to the histories, cultures, and societies of Central and Eastern Europe, including Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, and the successor states of Yugoslavia. Through a selection of articles and essays written by anthropologists and sociologists and based on their extended fieldwork in the region, students will explore both the ethnographic method and the experience of everyday life during and after the communist era. Topics will include: popular music under socialism, food and wine, environmental concerns, the status of Muslim minorities, socialist aesthetics, public memory and cultures of commemoration, privatization, advertising, women's rights, gender and sexuality, emergent nationalisms, and the rise of income inequality and homelessness. All readings and assignments in English. ANTH0630401 Society sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=REES0630401
REES 1179-401 War and Representation Oded Even Or
Qing Liao
MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This class will explore complications of representing war in the 20th and 21st centuries. War poses problems of perception, knowledge, and language. The notional "fog of war" describes a disturbing discrepancy between agents and actions of war; the extreme nature of the violence of warfare tests the limits of cognition, emotion, and memory; war's traditional dependence on declaration is often warped by language games--"police action," "military intervention," "nation-building," or palpably unnamed and unacknowledged state violence. Faced with the radical uncertainty that forms of war bring, modern and contemporary authors have experimented in historically, geographically, experientially and artistically particular ways, forcing us to reconsider even seemingly basic definitions of what a war story can be. Where does a war narrative happen? On the battlefield, in the internment camp, in the suburbs, in the ocean, in the ruins of cities, in the bloodstream? Who narrates war? Soldiers, refugees, gossips, economists, witnesses, bureaucrats, survivors, children, journalists, descendants and inheritors of trauma, historians, those who were never there? How does literature respond to the rise of terrorist or ideology war, the philosophical and material consequences of biological and cyber wars, the role of the nuclear state? How does the problem of war and representation disturb the difference between fiction and non-fiction? How do utilitarian practices of representation--propaganda, nationalist messaging, memorialization, xenophobic depiction--affect the approaches we use to study art? Finally, is it possible to read a narrative barely touched or merely contextualized by war and attend to the question of war's shaping influence? The class will concentrate on literary objects--short stories, and graphic novels--as well as film and television. Students of every level and major are welcome in and encouraged to join this class, regardless of literary experience. COML1050401, ENGL1449401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
REES 1570-401 Russia and Eastern Europe in International Affairs Mitchell Orenstein TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM Russia and the European Union (EU) are engaged in a battle for influence in Eastern Europe. EU foreign policy towards its Eastern neighbors is based on economic integration and the carrot of membership. With the application of this powerful incentive, Central and Southeastern European countries such as Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Croatia have progressed rapidly towards integration with the EU (and NATO). Yet, given Russia's opposition to the further enlargement, membership is off the table for the large semi-Western powers such as Russia itself and Turkey and the smaller countries inhabiting an emerging buffer zone between Russia and the EU, such as Georgia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan, Moldova, and Belarus. These in-between countries find themselves subject to intense competition for influence between Eastern and Western powers. In this context, EU countries must balance their energy dependence on Russia and need for new markets and geopolitical stability with concern for human rights, democratic governance, and self-determination. What are the trade-offs implicit in the foreign policies of Russia, EU member states, and Eastern Europe? What are the best policy approaches? What are the main opportunities and obstacles? PSCI0401401 Society sector (all classes)
REES 2250-301 Russian Culture Through Art and Architecture: From Fin de Siecle to Perestroika Djamilia Nazyrova MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course offers a general introduction to the history of Russian visual art and material culture. It surveys styles, traditions, and fashions in Russian visual culture from the Middle Ages to Perestroika, considering them in the context of Russian social and political history. The course examines the very important role that visual art played in the history of Russian culture, and seeks to arrive at a deeper understanding of the relationship between visual media and key aspects and events of Russian civilization, such as Orthodoxy, Westernization and Nationalism, Communist utopia, and political protest.
REES 2271-301 Post-Soviet Russia in Film Maria Bourlatskaya TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to improve their capabilities in formal and professional uses of the Russian language. Film is arguably the most powerful medium for reflecting changes in modern society. This course will examine Russia's transition to democracy and market economy through the eyes of its most creative and controversial cinematographers. The course will focus on the often agonizing process of changing values and attitudes as the country moves from Soviet to Post-Soviet society. Russian films with English subtitles will be supplemented by readings from contemporary Russian media sources. The course provides an excellent visual introduction to the problems of contemporary Russia society.
REES 5310-401 The Rise and Fall of the Russian Empire, 1552-1917 Peter I Holquist MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM How and why did Russia become the center of the world's largest empire, a single state encompassing eleven time zones and over a hundred ethnic groups? To answer this question, we will explore the rise of a distinct political culture beginning in medieval Muscovy, its transformation under the impact of a prolonged encounter with European civilization, and the various attempts to re-form Russia from above and below prior to the Revolution of 1917. Main themes include the facade vs. the reality of central authority, the intersection of foreign and domestic issues, the development of a radical intelligentsia, and the tension between empire and nation. HIST0240401, HIST5240401, REES0310401 Perm Needed From Instructor
REES 5550-640 Terrorism Vladislav T Todorov This course studies the emergence of organized terrorism in nineteenth-century Russia and its impact on public life in the West, the Balkans, and America. We investigate the political and cultural origins of terrorism, its conspiratorial routine, structures, methods, manuals, and manifestoes. Historical and cultural approaches converge in the discussion of intellectual movements that forged the formula of terrorism and influenced the professionalization of the underground, such as nihilism, anarchism, and populism. We discuss the stern terrorist personality, self-denial, revolutionary martyrdom, and conspiratorial militancy. The theatricals of terrorism are of particular interest, its bombastic acts, mystification, and techniques of spreading disorganizing fear in the global media environment. We trace the creation of counterterrorism police in late imperial Russia and its methods to infiltrate, demoralize, and dismantle the terrorist networks, and reengineer their social base. First Red Scare and the formation of the FBI constitutes a unique case of managing rampant political violence and countering the asymmetrical threat of terrorism. CIMS5550640 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=REES5550640
REES 5640-401 Geopolitics of Energy in Russia and Eurasia Anna Beta Mikulska TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Russia is one of the major players in the international energy market: third largest oil producer after the U.S. and Saudi Arabia and second-largest (after the U.S.) natural gas producers (2019). It is also a top coal and nuclear power producer. But the geopolitical might that the country holds with respect to energy markets stems not as much from how much energy it produces as from how much energy it exports. Today Russia leads global natural gas exports and trails only the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in oil exports. Russia is also reliably one of the top coal-exporting countries. This class will explore the geopolitics of energy focusing on the role of Russia as a leading global energy supplier. In doing so, it hopes to provide a slightly different understanding of global energy that is usually taught from either the U.S. or OPEC angle. ENMG5080401
REES 6130-401 Portraits of Soviet Society: Literature, Film, Drama Siarhei Biareishyk MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM How can art and literature open a window on Russian lives lived over the course of the tumultuous twentieth century? This course adopts a unique approach to questions of cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a medium-length film, text or set of texts by some of the most important cultural figures of the era (novella, play, memoir, film, short stories) which opens up a single scene of social history: work, village, avant-garde, war, Gulag, and so on. Each cultural work is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials: historical readings, paintings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. We will read social history through culture and culture through history. All readings and lectures in English. HIST0825401, REES0130401
REES 6131-401 Putin's Russia: Culture, Society and History Mitchell Orenstein TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Winston Churchill famously said that Russia "is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. Strikingly, today many informed Russians would agree: no one can provide definitive answers concerning what has driven Russian public life and politics over the past three years, as it ricochetted from the mass protests of 2011 and 2012, into the Pussy Riot scandal, then the Olympics, and most recently to the intense patriotism driving the Russian annexation of Crimea and intervention in Ukraine. In this course we will examine how Russians themselves communicate about and represent Russia and what this reveals about this complex society and its development. We will consider print journalism, novels, films, televised media, and the internetpaying close attention both to particular representations and to social institutions for their production, dissemination and consumption. Topics of special concern will include: conspiracy theories, representations of Russian history, collective identity and patriotism, intellectuals and elites, gender and sexuality, consumption and wealth. Putins Russia is an introductory level course for which no prior knowledge Russian history, culture or society is required. All readings and screenings will be in English. Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Russian is required. REES0131401
REES 6172-401 Madness and Madmen in Russian Culture Molly Peeney TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Is "insanity" today the same thing as "madness" of old? Who gets to define what it means to be "sane," and why? Are the causes of madness biological or social? In this course, we will grapple with these and similar questions while exploring Russia's fascinating history of madness as a means to maintain critique, or subvert the status quo. We will consider the concept of madness in Russian culture beginning with its earliest folkloric roots and trace its depiction and function in the figure of the Russian "holy fool," in classical literature, and in contemporary film. Readings will include works by many Russian greats, such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov and Nabokov. COML1097401, REES0172401
REES 6410-401 Masterpieces of 19th Century Russian Literature Aleksey Berg TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM A bronze monument to an all-powerful emperor comes to life and pursues a poor everyman through the streets, driving him to his death. A studious young man kills an old woman as a philosophical experiment. A young woman at the height of aristocratic society abandons her husband and young son to devote herself to her lover. These and other tales from the classics of nineteenth-century Russian literature will touch and delight you, get under your skin, and even attempt to show you how to live. We will read these tales in order to understand how books can become events in their own right, how Russian literature gained such power and prestige, and what it can still teach us today. Authors include Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Pavlova, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. REES0410401
REES 6435-401 Modern Literary Theory and Criticism Ian Fleishman
Andrea Goulet
M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course will provide an overview of major European thinkers in critical theory of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will pay particular attention to critical currents that originated in Eastern European avant-garde and early socialist contexts and their legacies and successors. Topics covered will include: Russian Formalism and its successors in Structuralism and Deconstruction (Shklovsky, Levi-Strauss, Jakobson, Derrida); Bakhtin and his circle, dialogism and its later western reception; debates over aesthetics and politics of the 1930s (Lukacs, Brecht, Adorno, Benjamin, Radek, Clement Greenberg); the October group; Marxism, new Left criticism, and later lefts (Althusser, Williams, Eagleton, Jameson, Zizek). COML6050401, ENGL7905401, FREN6050401, GRMN6050401, ITAL6050401
REES 6683-401 Cultures of Reading in Imperial Russia D. Brian Kim W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Topics vary annually Cultures of Reading in Imperial Russia -~-~-~-~-~-~-~ What did it mean to be a reader in imperial Russia? What did people read, and to what ends? How was literacy cultivated, and what were the social implications? In this course, students will develop a broad theoretical apparatus in the history and sociology of reading in nineteenth-century Russia to analyze several canonical works of literature that thematize and foreground the act of reading: as a pursuit undertaken for the betterment of self, society, nation, and world; as a light pastime for the bored, contemplative, or idle; but also as an enterprise fraught with potential for moral or civic ruin. In addition to investigating allusions to the specific texts and authors read by literary characters, we will also examine the reading habits of our own authors as both consumers and producers of literary culture. We will consider these dynamics against a backdrop of constant fluctuations in educational policies, the book market, and the circulation of texts within and beyond Russia as we work together to develop an understanding of the imperial Russian reading public(s). ARTH5730401, CIMS5730401, COML5730401, ENGL5730401, GRMN5730401
RUSS 0100-401 Russian I Aleksey Berg MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is the first in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, intended for students with no previous background in Russian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. It will also introduce you to Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on topics concerning your daily life. You will know greetings and everyday expressions, talk about people and objects in your life, your hobbies, likes and dislikes, past activities and your residence. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Russian. RUSS5100401
RUSS 0100-402 Russian I Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the first in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, intended for students with no previous background in Russian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. It will also introduce you to Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on topics concerning your daily life. You will know greetings and everyday expressions, talk about people and objects in your life, your hobbies, likes and dislikes, past activities and your residence. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Russian. RUSS5100402
RUSS 0100-680 Russian I Lada Vassilieva TR 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is the first in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, intended for students with no previous background in Russian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. It will also introduce you to Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on topics concerning your daily life. You will know greetings and everyday expressions, talk about people and objects in your life, your hobbies, likes and dislikes, past activities and your residence. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Russian. RUSS5100680
RUSS 0201-401 Russian for Heritage Speakers I Djamilia Nazyrova MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This is the first in the series of literacy courses for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to improve literacy skills and language competence. The course aims to enhance linguistic accuracy in spelling, grammar, word choice and pronunciation, as well as fluency, narrative structure and appropriate use of idiomatic expressions in both speaking and writing. We will also focus on developing effective reading and listening strategies. Course readings include works of Russian classics, contemporary literature and mass media on cultural issues and daily life of the Russian-speaking community around the world. Students who complete this course in combination with RUSS0401 satisfy Penn Language Requirement. RUSS5201401 Perm Needed From Instructor
RUSS 0300-401 Russian III Molly Peeney MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is the first in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian II. The course will strengthen students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and will expand students' active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events and situations, important cultural figures. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS5300401
RUSS 0300-402 Russian III Maria Alley MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the first in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian II. The course will strengthen students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and will expand students' active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events and situations, important cultural figures. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS5300402
RUSS 1100-401 Russian Society Today Aleksey Berg MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course develops students' skills in speaking and writing about topics in Russian literature, contemporary society, politics, and everyday life. Topics include women, work and family; sexuality; the economic situation; environmental problems; and life values. Materials include selected short stories by 19th and 20th century Russian authors, video-clips of interviews, excerpts from films, and articles from the Russian media. Continued work on grammar and vocabulary building. RUSS5500401
RUSS 5100-401 Russian I Aleksey Berg MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is for graduate students. It is the first in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, intended for students with no previous background in Russian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. It will also introduce you to Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on topics concerning your daily life. You will know greetings and everyday expressions, talk about people and objects in your life, your hobbies, likes and dislikes, past activities and your residence. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Russian. RUSS0100401
RUSS 5100-402 Russian I Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the first in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, intended for students with no previous background in Russian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. It will also introduce you to Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on topics concerning your daily life. You will know greetings and everyday expressions, talk about people and objects in your life, your hobbies, likes and dislikes, past activities and your residence. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Russian. RUSS0100402
RUSS 5100-680 Russian I Lada Vassilieva TR 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the first in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, intended for students with no previous background in Russian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. It will also introduce you to Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on topics concerning your daily life. You will know greetings and everyday expressions, talk about people and objects in your life, your hobbies, likes and dislikes, past activities and your residence. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Russian. RUSS0100680
RUSS 5201-401 Russian for Heritage Speakers I Djamilia Nazyrova MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to achieve proficiency in the language. Topics will include an intensive introduction to the Russian writing system and grammar, focusing on exciting materials and examples drawn from classic and contemporary Russian culture and social life. Students who complete this course in combination with RUSS361 satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. Prerequisite: Previous language experience required. RUSS0201401
RUSS 5300-401 Russian III Molly Peeney MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is for graduate students. It is the first in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian II. The course will strengthen students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and will expand students' active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events and situations, important cultural figures. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS0300401
RUSS 5300-402 Russian III Maria Alley MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the first in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian II. The course will strengthen students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and will expand students' active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events and situations, important cultural figures. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS0300402
RUSS 5500-401 Russian Society Today Aleksey Berg MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the first in a series of third-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian IV. In this course we will explore aspects of contemporary Russian society and every day life including typical vacation and traveling practices, religion and belief, and issues of migration through current mass media, polling data, TV, radio, and film. The course is designed to strengthen and expand students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian, as well as to increase students' active and passive vocabulary on a wide range of topics. The course also aims to solidify students' knowledge of the basic structure of Russian they learned in previous courses and focuses on more advanced grammatical concepts including verbal aspect. By the end of the course, you will be able to write short analytical essays in Russian on a variety of issues. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. RUSS1100401
UKRN 0100-680 Ukrainian I Kseniia Power TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is the first in a series of first-year courses, intended for students with no previous background in Ukrainian. The course develops competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Ukrainian. It will also introduce you to Ukrainian culture through exciting authentic materials, including songs, videos, and short stories. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Ukrainian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Ukrainian on topics concerning your daily life. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Ukrainian.
UKRN 0300-680 Ukrainian III Kseniia Power TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is the first in a series of second-year courses, continuation of Ukrainian II. The course will strengthen students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Ukrainian and will expand students' active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Ukrainian culture through exciting authentic materials, including Ukrainian newspaper articles on current events in business, education, politics, science, sports, and other topics. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Ukrainian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Ukrainian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events and situations, important cultural figures. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts.
UKRN 1100-680 Advanced Ukrainian I Kseniia Power MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is the first in a series of third-year courses, continuation of Ukrainian IV. The course is designed to strengthen and expand students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Ukrainian and increase students’ active and passive vocabulary on a wide range of topics. The course also aims to solidify the knowledge of the basic structure of Ukrainian students acquired in previous courses and focuses on more advanced grammatical concepts. Students will learn more about Ukrainian literature, history, and modern life through the authentic materials, poems and literature excerpts. The course is conducted almost entirely in Ukrainian.