Courses for Spring 2023

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
HUNG 0200-680 Hungarian II Adrienn V Mizsei TR 7:00 PM-8:59 PM This course is the second in a series of first-year courses, continuation of Hungarian I. The course continues to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Hungarian. We will continue the exploration of Hungarian culture through exciting authentic materials, including songs, videos, short stories, and internet sites. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Hungarian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Hungarian on many topics in informal and some formal contexts concerning your daily life, including planning a trip to Hungary, staying in a hotel, ordering meals, and buying goods. You will also be able to write longer personalized messages in Hungarian.
HUNG 0400-680 Hungarian IV Adrienn V Mizsei MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is the second in a series of second-year courses, continuation of Hungarian III. The course will continue strengthening and expanding students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Hungarian and increasing active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Hungarian culture through exciting authentic materials, including online news resources, songs, and videos. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Hungarian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Hungarian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events, attitudes and perspectives. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. Satisfies Penn Language Requirement.
HUNG 0400-681 Hungarian IV Adrienn V Mizsei MW 7:00 PM-8:29 PM This course is the second in a series of second-year courses, continuation of Hungarian III. The course will continue strengthening and expanding students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Hungarian and increasing active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Hungarian culture through exciting authentic materials, including online news resources, songs, and videos. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Hungarian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Hungarian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events, attitudes and perspectives. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. Satisfies Penn Language Requirement.
PLSH 0200-680 Polish II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 7:00 PM-8:59 PM This course is the second in a series of first-year courses, continuation of Polish I. The course continues to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Polish. We will continue the exploration of Polish culture through exciting authentic materials, including Polish films, history and contemporary affairs. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Polish. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Polish on many topics in informal and some formal contexts concerning your daily life. You will also be able to write longer personalized messages in Polish.
PLSH 0401-680 Polish for Heritage Speakers II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is the second in the series of literacy courses for students who have spoken Polish at home and seek to improve literacy skills and language competence, continuation of PLSH0201. The course continues to focus on enhancing linguistic accuracy in spelling, grammar, word choice and pronunciation, as well as fluency and narrative structure in both speaking and writing. We will continue developing effective reading and listening strategies and expanding students’ active and passive vocabulary through interpretation and analysis of various literary genres and a broad variety of cultural themes. Satisfies Penn Language Requirement.
REES 0110-001 Portraits of Russian Society: Art, Fiction, Drama D. Brian Kim TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course covers 19C Russian cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a single medium-length text (novella, play, memoir) which opens up a single scene of social history birth, death, duel, courtship, tsar, and so on. Each of these main texts is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials paintings, historical readings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. The object of the course is to understand the social codes and rituals that informed nineteenth-century Russian life, and to apply this knowledge in interpreting literary texts, other cultural objects, and even historical and social documents (letters, memoranda, etc.). We will attempt to understand social history and literary interpretation as separate disciplines yet also as disciplines that can inform one another. In short: we will read the social history through the text, and read the text against the social history. HIST0823001 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=REES0110001
REES 0190-401 Russia and the West D. Brian Kim TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course will explore the representations of the West in eighteenth- and nineteenth- century Russian literature and philosophy. We will consider the Russian visions of various events and aspects of Western political and social life Revolutions, educational system, public executions, resorts, etc. within the context of Russian intellectual history. We will examine how images of the West reflect Russia's own cultural concerns, anticipations, and biases, as well as aesthetic preoccupations and interests of Russian writers. The discussion will include literary works by Karamzin, Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Leskov, and Tolstoy, as well as non-fictional documents, such as travelers' letters, diaries, and historiosophical treatises of Russian Freemasons, Romantic and Positivist thinkers, and Russian social philosophers of the late Nineteenth century. A basic knowledge of nineteenth-century European history is desirable. The class will consist of lectures, discussion, short writing assignments, and two in-class tests. COML2020401, HIST0824401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=REES0190401
REES 0270-401 Russian History in Film Aleksey Berg TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course draws on fictional, dramatic and cinematic representations of Russian history based on Russian as well as non-Russian sources and interpretations. The analysis targets major modes of imagining, such as narrating, showing and reenacting historical events, personae and epochs justified by different, historically mutating ideological postulates and forms of national self-consciousness. Common stereotypes of picturing Russia from "foreign" perspectives draw special attention. The discussion involves the following themes and outstanding figures: the mighty autocrats Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great; the tragic ruler Boris Godunov; the brazen rebel and royal impostor Pugachev; the notorious Rasputin, his uncanny powers, sex-appeal, and court machinations; Lenin and the October Revolution; images of war; times of construction and times of collapse of the Soviet Colossus. CIMS2750401, CIMS5750401, REES5270401
REES 0311-401 The Soviet Century, 1917-1991 Benjamin Nathans MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Out of an obscure, backward empire, the Soviet Union emerged to become the great political laboratory of the twentieth century. This course will trace the roots of the world's first socialist society and its attempts to recast human relations and human nature itself. Topics include the origins of the Revolution of 1917, the role of ideology in state policy and everyday life, the Soviet Union as the center of world communism, the challenge of ethnic diversity, and the reasons for the USSR's sudden implosion at the end of the century.Focusing on politics, society, culture, and their interaction, we will examine the rulers (from Lenin to Gorbachev) as well as the ruled (peasants, workers, and intellectuals; Russians and non-Russians). The course will feature discussions of selected texts, including primary sources in translation. HIST0290401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=REES0311401
REES 0430-001 Masterpieces of 20th-Century Russian Literature Aleksey Berg MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM "Only in Russia is poetry respected. They kill you for it,” famously quipped the poet Osip Mandelstam, who died in Joseph Stalin’s concentration camps. Russia is a society that takes literature seriously—one in which the pen is assumed to have direct historical consequences. In this course, we will study how twentieth century Russian literature actively participated in war, revolution, totalitarian dictatorship, and resistance. The masterworks we will study open windows into worlds of revolutionary rapture, moral uplift in the face of tyranny, courageous subversion of the repressive state, and historical reflection on its failures. Our readings will range from an avant-garde play intended to rewire your mind, to an epic representation of revolutionary social transformation, to surreal and absurdist representations of a world gone mad. In other words: fasten your seatbelts low and tight across your waist; turbulence ahead! Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
REES 0471-401 Russian Short Story Djamilia Nazyrova TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course studies the development of 19th and 20th-century Russian literature through one of its most distinct and highly recognized genres -- the short story. The readings include great masters of fiction such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, and others. The course presents the best works of short fiction situating them in a larger cultural-political context. The students learn about the historical formation, poetic virtue, and thematic characteristics of major narrative modes such as sentimentalism, romanticism, utopia, realism, modernism, and socialist realism. We study literary devices, styles, and trends of storytelling such as irony, absurd, satire, grotesque, anecdote, etc. Main topics include culture of the duel; the role of chance; the riddle of death; anatomy of madness; imprisonment and survival. Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
REES 1174-401 National Antiquities: Genealogies, Hagiographies, Holy Objects Julia Verkholantsev T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Human societies have always wanted to know about their origins, the reasons for their customs, the foundations of their social institutions and religious beliefs, and the justification of their power structures. They have conceived of creation myths and of origins stories for their communities in order to position themselves within the past and present of the natural and human worlds. The newly Christianized kingdoms of Medieval Europe faced the challenge of securing a place in the new vision of universal Providential history, and they inscribed their own histories into the narratives they knew from the authoritative sources of the time - biblical genealogies and heroic stories inherited from the poets of classical antiquity. The deeds and virtues of saintly kings and church hierarchs provided a continuity of historical narrative on the sacred map of time and space. In the 19th century, while interest in medieval antiquity as a source of inspiration for political and cultural renewal brought about a critical study of evidence, it also effected reinterpretation and repurposing of this evidence vis-a-vis a new political concept - that of a nation. This seminar will focus on central, eastern and southeast European nations and explore three categories of "national antiquities" that have been prominent in the workings of their modern nationalisms: (1) stories of ethnogenesis (so-called, origo gentis) that narrate and explain the beginnings and genealogy of peoples and states, as they are recorded in medieval and early modern chronicles, (2) narratives about holy people, who are seen as national patron-saints, and (3) material objects of sacred significance (manuscripts, religious ceremony objects, crowns, icons) that act as symbols of political, cultural and national identities. Our approach will be two-fold: On the one hand, we will read medieval sources and ask the question of what they tell us about the mindset of the authors and societies that created them. We will think about how the knowledge of the past helped medieval societies legitimize the present and provide a model for the future. On the other hand, we will observe how medieval narratives and artifacts have been interpreted in modern times and how they became repurposed - first, during the "Romantic" stage of national awakening, then in the post-imperial era of independent nation-states, and, finally, in the post-Soviet context of reimagined Europe. We will observe how the study of nationalistic mentality enhances our understanding of how the past is represented and repurposed in scholarship and politics. HIST0725401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=REES1174401
REES 1380-401 Tolstoy’s War and Peace and the Age of Napoleon Peter I Holquist MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM In this course we will read what many consider to be the greatest book in world literature. This work, Tolstoy's War and Peace, is devoted to one of the most momentous periods in world history, the Napoleonic Era (1789-1815). We will study both the book and the era of the Napoleonic Wars: the military campaigns of Napoleon and his opponents, the grand strategies of the age, political intrigues and diplomatic betrayals, the ideologies and human dramas, the relationship between art and history. How does literature help us to understand this era? How does history help us to understand this great book? Because we will read War and Peace over the course of the entire semester, readings will be manageable and very enjoyable. COML1262401, HIST1260401
REES 1481-401 Sex and Representation Liz Rose M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course explores literature that resists normative categories of gender and sexuality. By focusing on figures writing from the margins, we will explore how radical approaches to narrative form and subject-matter invite us to think in new ways about desire and identity. We will read texts that blur the boundaries between fact and fiction, hybridizing the genres of poetry, drama, and autobiography to produce new forms of expression, such as the graphic novel, auto-fiction, and prose poetry. From Viriginia Woolf's gender-bending epic, Orlando, to Tony Kushner's Angels in America, this course traces how non-normative desire is produced and policed by social and literary contexts - and how those contexts can be re-imagined and transformed. CIMS1027401, COML1027401, GSWS1027401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
REES 1535-402 Russian Politics Rudra Sil MW 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a brief discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implications of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the Putin and post-Putin era. PSCI1172402
REES 1631-401 Anarchism: Theories and Ethnographies Kristen R Ghodsee MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM "That we are Utopians is well known. So Utopian are we that we go the length of believing that the Revolution can and ought to assure shelter, food, and clothes to all..." -Pyotr Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread. Although born in the West through the works of William Godwin and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, anarchism as a political theory was subsequently developed by a variety of Russian and Ukrainian theorists and activists, including Mikhail Bakunin, Lev Tolstoy, Pyotr Kropotkin, Nestor Makhno, and Emma Goldman (in exile in the United States). Anarchism fundamentally questions the need for political power and authority, particularly as embodied in a state. As a political theory, anarchism makes moral claims about the importance of individual liberty and presents a positive theory of human flourishing that is based on ideals of non-coercive consensus building. This course investigates the 19th century theoretical foundations of Russian and Ukrainian anarchist theory through a close examination of key texts from the 19th and early 20th centuries and includes ethnographic explorations of anarchist practices in eastern Europe in the 21st century. All readings will be in English. ANTH2620401, REES5631401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=REES1631401
REES 2172-401 Global Landscapes: Russia in XXI century Djamilia Nazyrova MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The goal of this course is to improve students' ability to engage in informed and articulate debate on a number of issues facing Russia and the world at large today, such as: political freedom, and the future of political protest, environmental problems and catastrophes and their aftermath (Chernobyl nuclear disaster), problems of social inequality and redistribution of wealth, national security, the economy, health care, international politics. This will be accomplished through intensive work on expanding lexical knowledge, increasing grammatical accuracy, and developing rhetorical skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend increasingly complex written and spoken texts on a range of topics and defend their own viewpoint in oral debate and persuasive essay formats. REES5172401
REES 2270-001 Contemporary Russia Through Film Maria Bourlatskaya MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course continues developing students' advanced skills in Russian and offers intensive study of Russian film, arguably the most powerful medium for reflecting changes in modern society. This course will examine Russia's transition to democracy and market economy through the eyes of its most creative and controversial cinematographers. The course will focus on the often agonizing process of changing values and attitudes as the country moves from Soviet to Post-Soviet society. Russian films with English subtitles will be supplemented by readings from contemporary Russian media sources. The course provides an excellent visual introduction to the problems of contemporary Russia society. CIMS2270001
REES 5172-401 Global Landscapes: Russia in XXI century Djamilia Nazyrova MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The goal of this course is to improve students' ability to engage in informed and articulate debate on a number of issues facing Russia and the world at large today, such as: political freedom, and the future of political protest, environmental problems and catastrophes and their aftermath (Chernobyl nuclear disaster), problems of social inequality and redistribution of wealth, national security, the economy, health care, international politics. This will be accomplished through intensive work on expanding lexical knowledge, increasing grammatical accuracy, and developing rhetorical skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to comprehend increasingly complex written and spoken texts on a range of topics and defend their own viewpoint in oral debate and persuasive essay formats. REES2172401
REES 5270-401 Russian History in Film Aleksey Berg TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM The course draws on the cinematic/fictional representation of the Russian/Soviet history based on Russian as well as non-Russian sources. The analysis targets major modes of imagining, staging and reenacting history, construction of images that satisfy dominant political, cultural and ideological stereotypes, and help create national identities. Bias, eye-witness accounts, propaganda uses and abuses of history, forgeries and the production of alt-facts become topics of particular interest. The discussions involve nation builders, iconic heroes and charismatic antiheroes, great commanders and revolutionaries such as Alexander Nevsky, Ivan the Terrible, Rasputin and the Fall of the Romanovs, Lenin and the October Revolution, Stalin and the construction of the Soviet Colossus, the Storming of the Winter Palace, the Civil War, the Great Purge, the Red Scare in the US, etc. CIMS2750401, CIMS5750401, REES0270401
REES 5272-640 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film Vladislav T Todorov This course studies political violence, terrorism, civil wars, ethnic conflicts, and genocidal policies as represented in the social media, cable news, documentaries, feature films. We discuss various techniques and strategies of the propaganda wars, post-truth media environment, etc. The regions of interest are Former Soviet Union, Russia, the Caucasus, and the Balkans, US homegrown political violence, and the Middle East. The students are expected to develop and demonstrate a critical approach to different aspects of the cinematic, news, and social media representation of ethnic conflict. We focus on the violent developments that took place in Russia and the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc, conditioned by the geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing both, the Eastern and the Western perspective. CIMS5272640 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202310&c=REES5272640
REES 5631-401 Anarchism: Theories and Ethnographies Kristen R Ghodsee MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM "That we are Utopians is well known. So Utopian are we that we go the length of believing that the Revolution can and ought to assure shelter, food, and clothes to all..." -Pyotr Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread. Although born in the West through the works of William Godwin and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, anarchism as a political theory was subsequently developed by a variety of Russian and Ukrainian theorists and activists, including Mikhail Bakunin, Lev Tolstoy, Pyotr Kropotkin, Nestor Makhno, and Emma Goldman (in exile in the United States). Anarchism fundamentally questions the need for political power and authority, particularly as embodied in a state. As a political theory, anarchism makes moral claims about the importance of individual liberty and presents a positive theory of human flourishing that is based on ideals of non-coercive consensus building. This course investigates the 19th century theoretical foundations of Russian and Ukrainian anarchist theory through a close examination of key texts from the 19th and early 20th centuries and includes ethnographic explorations of anarchist practices in eastern Europe in the 21st century. All readings will be in English. ANTH2620401, REES1631401
REES 6151-401 Reading Marx’s Capital: Divergent Traditions in Europe, the Soviet Union, and the Global South Siarhei Biareishyk R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Karl Marx’s masterpiece Capital received little attention at the time of its publication, but gained new life in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The afterlives of Capital, however, took disparate forms across different regions and traditions globally: while working on the same text, these traditions gave rise to conflicting and contradictory interpretations, antagonistic dialogues, and cross-disciplinary encounters. This seminar will examine a series of exemplary interpretations of Capital with attention to detail in order to clarify the stakes of different readings and pose the question of relevance of Marx’s masterpiece for the contemporary moment. We will investigate how political conjunctures, regional specificities, and ideological concerns shape disparate modes and cultures of reading. We will also examine how Capital is transfigured through the lens of disciplines such as literary studies and comparative literature, philosophy, political science, postcolonial studies, and economics. We will also pose the question of philosophical genealogies of Capital, tracing how divergent philosophical backgrounds inflect the reconfigurations of Marx’s thought, e.g., in examining “Hegelian,” “Spinozist,” and “Epicurian” readings. The topics may include, but are not limited to, the following regions and traditions: France (Louis Althusser group), Italy (Mario Tronti and autonomia tradition), and Germany (Neue Marx Lektüre); Soviet Union (Isaak Rubin, Evald Ilyenkov); Bolivia (Alvaro Garcia Linera), and Argentina (Ernesto Laclau). Finally, we will engage with the most recent readings of Capital in the twenty-first century in the works of thinkers such as Sylvia Federici, Michael Heinrich, and A. Kiarina Kordela, among others. COML6210401, GRMN6210401
RUSS 0150-401 Accelerated Russian I-II Maria Alley MTWR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM TWO IN ONE: This is an intensive two-credit course covering two semesters of the first-year sequence in the traditional track (RUSS0100 and 0200). The course is designed for students with no background in Russian and develops competence in speaking, reading, writing and understanding contemporary Russian. It will also introduce you to Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on topics concerning your daily life. You will know greetings and everyday expressions, talk about people in your life, your hobbies and interests, past activities and future plans, your residence, food preferences and health. You will also be able to write short personalized messages in Russian in a variety of informal ad formal contexts. Together with RUSS0300 and 0400 fulfills Penn Language Requirement. RUSS5150401
RUSS 0200-401 Russian II Aleksey Berg MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the second in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian I. The course continues to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and some formal contexts concerning your daily life. You will be able to talk in detail about your interests, study habits and daily schedule, plans for the future, food preferences and health and compare these with practices common in the target cultures. You will also be able to write longer personalized messages in Russian. RUSS5200401
RUSS 0200-680 Russian II Lada Vassilieva TR 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is the second in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian I. The course continues to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and some formal contexts concerning your daily life. You will be able to talk in detail about your interests, study habits and daily schedule, plans for the future, food preferences and health and compare these with practices common in the target cultures. You will also be able to write longer personalized messages in Russian. RUSS5200680
RUSS 0400-401 Russian IV Molly Peeney MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is the second in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian III. The course will continue strengthening and expanding students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and increasing active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class works emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events, attitudes and perspectives. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS5400401
RUSS 0400-402 Russian IV Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is the second in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian III. The course will continue strengthening and expanding students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and increasing active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class works emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events, attitudes and perspectives. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS5400402
RUSS 1200-401 Russia Society Today II Djamilia Nazyrova MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS5600401
RUSS 5150-401 Accelerated Elementary Russian Maria Alley MTWR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM TWO IN ONE: This is an intensive two-credit course covering two semesters of the first-year sequence (RUSS001 and 002). The course is designed for students with no background in Russian and develops language competence in speaking, reading, writing and understanding contemporary Russian. Class work emphasizes development of communication skills and cultural awareness. Together with RUSS003 and 004 fulfills Penn Language Requirement. RUSS0150401 Perm Needed From Department
RUSS 5200-401 Russian II Aleksey Berg MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the second in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian I. The course continues to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and some formal contexts concerning your daily life. You will be able to talk in detail about your interests, study habits and daily schedule, plans for the future, food preferences and health and compare these with practices common in the target cultures. You will also be able to write longer personalized messages in Russian. RUSS0200401
RUSS 5200-680 Russian II Lada Vassilieva TR 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the second in a series of first-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian I. The course continues to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and some formal contexts concerning your daily life. You will be able to talk in detail about your interests, study habits and daily schedule, plans for the future, food preferences and health and compare these with practices common in the target cultures. You will also be able to write longer personalized messages in Russian. RUSS0200680
RUSS 5400-401 Russian IV Molly Peeney MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is for graduate students. It is the second in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian III. The course will continue strengthening and expanding students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and increasing active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class works emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events, attitudes and perspectives. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS0400401 Perm Needed From Instructor
RUSS 5400-402 Russian IV Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the second in a series of second-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian III. The course will continue strengthening and expanding students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian and increasing active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Russian culture and Russian-speaking cultures around the world through exciting authentic materials, including internet sites and cultural artifacts, songs, videos, short stories, as well as conversations with native speakers. Class works emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Russian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events, attitudes and perspectives. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. RUSS0400402 Perm Needed From Department
RUSS 5600-401 Russian Society Today II Djamilia Nazyrova MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is for graduate students. It is the second in a series of third-year courses in the traditional track, continuation of Russian 1100. In this course we will continue exploring aspects of contemporary Russian society and every day life including gender issues, educational system, standardized testing, and health care through current mass media, polling data, TV, radio, and film. The course is designed to strengthen and expand students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Russian, as well as to increase students' active and passive vocabulary on a wide range of topics. The course continues to solidify students' knowledge of the basic structure of Russian, which they learned in previous courses and focuses on more advanced grammatical concepts including verbal aspect. By the end of the course, you will be able to write short analytical essays in Russian on an increasing number of issues. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Russian. RUSS1200401
UKRN 0200-680 Ukrainian II Kseniia Power MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course is the second in a series of first-year courses, continuation of Ukrainian I. The course continues to develop competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Ukrainian. We will continue the exploration of Ukrainian culture through exciting authentic materials, including songs, videos, and short stories. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Ukrainian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in simple conversations in Ukrainian on many topics in informal and some formal contexts concerning your daily life. You will also be able to write longer personalized messages in Ukrainian.
UKRN 0400-680 Ukrainian IV Kseniia Power MW 5:15 PM-6:44 PM This course is the second in a series of second-year courses, continuation of Ukrainian III. The course will continue strengthening and expanding students' competence in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding contemporary Ukrainian and increasing active and passive vocabulary on a variety of topics. We will continue the exploration of Ukrainian culture through exciting authentic materials, including Ukrainian newspaper articles on a variety of cultural themes and current events. Class work emphasizes development of communicative competence in real-life situations, spontaneous interactions, pair and group work and is conducted almost entirely in Ukrainian. By the end of the course, you will be able to engage in increasingly complex conversations in Ukrainian on many topics in informal and formal contexts concerning your daily life, significant personal and cultural events, attitudes and perspectives. You will be able to write longer messages in a variety of informal and formal contexts. Satisfies Penn Language Requirement.