Courses for Spring 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
EEUR 010-401 Central and Eastern Europe: Cultures, Histories, Societies Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region - its cultures, histories, and societies - from the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and sub-regions, such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through an individual research paper and class presentations. COML010401, RUSS009401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
EEUR 119-401 Prague: the Making of A European Nation Julia Verkholantsev MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Even though such "supercities" as New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Washington, Boston, and San Francisco claim a special place in the minds and hearts of Americans, no American city plays as crucial a role in the formation of national identity among Americans as Prague does among the Czechs. One may even argue that the formation of a national identity associated with a nation's urban center is a European phenomenon. The focus of the proposed course is Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic and the geographical center of Europe. From the 14th century, when it became a seat of the Holy Roman Emperor, to the Hussite Revolution; from the 19th-century national revival and the birth of the independent Czechoslovakia in 1918, to the "Prague Offensive," the last major operation of the Soviet Army in World War II and the re-appearance of the Soviet tanks after the "Prague Spring" in 1968, to the "Velvet" Revolution in 1989, and on to the present day as an EU member, Prague has been the site of major European developments and is where the Czech national identity was forged. Today a popular tourist destination with a uniquely preserved historical center that is part of the UNESCO World Heritage List, Prague combines national character with an increasingly cosmopolitan flavor. Focusing on what makes Prague a national capital, we will note how the "national" negotiates its place with the "global." As a cultural hub and political center, Prague is the repository of a cultural collective memory and of historical and emotional records. It thus presents an excellent case study of how a national identity could be formed around a single urban center. The study of the many layers of Prague's urban landscape allows us to observe how history is built into the physical environment, while the analysis of literary and artistic production reveals how the city has become perceived as a national shrine, embodied in word and image. Students will read the "Prague text" as humanists, anthropologists, and historians. They will learn to apply methods of literary, cultural, and historical analyses, and will ask questions of what it means to be a Czech, a Central European, a European, and even, perhaps, an American. The travel component will further one of the key goals of this seminar: to develop cultural knowledge and sensitivity together with the appreciation of socio-cultural differences. COML122401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Global Seminar</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Enrollment By Application Only See Dept Website</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019A&course=EEUR119401
EEUR 122-680 Elementary Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 07:30 PM-09:30 PM Continuation of EEUR121. The second semester of elementary Hungarian course continues on providing functional language competency in basic grammar, vocabulary, comprehension, reading, writing and speaking in Hungarian. Students will continue to learn communicating in everyday life situations as well as in organizing a trip to Hungary, staying in a hotel, ordering meals, buying goods, and participating in cultural activities by using authentic Hungarian online resources and interactive class activities. I
EEUR 124-680 Intermed Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM The intermediate Hungarian II course continues EEUR123. Class documents and activities enable students to develop functional intermediate Hungarian competency by exploring Hungary and its culture, reading authentic online news sources, practicing listening and comprehension skills via video and audio material, researching cultural events and traditions, and exploring Hungarians' everyday lives. At the end of the semester, students will be able to participate and pass their Oral Competency Exit Interview on intermediate level and discuss topics, such as student life, family, friends, academic and student life activities/interests, travel, shopping, and cultural events. M
EEUR 124-681 Intermed Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 05:30 PM-07:00 PM The intermediate Hungarian II course continues EEUR123. Class documents and activities enable students to develop functional intermediate Hungarian competency by exploring Hungary and its culture, reading authentic online news sources, practicing listening and comprehension skills via video and audio material, researching cultural events and traditions, and exploring Hungarians' everyday lives. At the end of the semester, students will be able to participate and pass their Oral Competency Exit Interview on intermediate level and discuss topics, such as student life, family, friends, academic and student life activities/interests, travel, shopping, and cultural events. M
EEUR 159-401 Population and Public Health in Eastern Europe Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English. ANTH159401, SOCI159401, RUSS159401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
EEUR 165-401 Russian & East European Film After World War II Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course examines the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema after WWII - Stalinist aesthetics and desalinization, WWII in film, the installation of totalitarianism in Eastern Europe and the Cold War in film, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the post-soviet condition, cinematic representations of Yugoslavia's violent breakup; the new Romanian waive. Major filmmakers in discussion include Kalatozov, Tarkovsky, Wajda, Polanski, Forman, Mentzel, Sabo, Kusturitsa, Konchalovsky, Mikhalkov and others. CIMS165401, RUSS165401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span>
EEUR 430-640 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film Vladislav T. Todorov M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course studies the cinematic representation of civil wars, ethnic conflicts, nationalistic doctrines, and genocidal policies. The focus is on the violent developments that took place in Russia and on the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and were conditioned by the new geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had already created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing the Eastern, as well as the Western perspective. The films include masterpieces such as "Time of the Gypsies", "Underground", "Prisoner of the Mountains", "Before the Rain", "Behind Enemy Lines", and others. RUSS430640, CIMS430640
EEUR 616-401 Approaches To Literary Texts Julia Verkholantsev F 11:00 AM-02:00 PM Most seminars focus on literary texts composed during a single historical period;this course is unusual in inviting students to consider the challenges of approaching texts from a range of different historical eras. Taught by a team of literary specialists representing diverse periods and linguistic traditions and conducted as a hands-on workshop, this seminar is designed to help students of literature gain expertise in analysis and interpretation of literary works across the boundaries of time, geography, and language, from classic to modern. Students will approach literature as a historical discipline and learn about key methodological issues and questions that specialists in each period and field ask about texts that their disciplines study. The diachronic and cross-cultural perspectives inform discussions of language and style, text types and genres, notions of alterity, fictionality, literariness, symbolism, intertextuality, materiality, and interfaces with other disciplines. This is a unique opportunity to learn in one course about diverse literary approaches from specialists in different fields. Master classes are taught by Kevin Brownlee, Linda Chance, Eva del Soldato, Huda Fakhreddine, Scott Francis, Nili Gold, Bridget Murnghan, Deven Patel, Kevin Platt, Michael Solomon, Emily Steiner, Julia Verkholantsev, and Emily Wilson. CLST636401, ENGL616401, ROML616401, EALC715401, COML616401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019A&course=EEUR616401
RUSS 002-401 Elementary Russian II Djamilia Nazyrova MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS502401 I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 002-680 Elementary Russian II Lada Vassilieva TR 06:00 PM-08:30 PM Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 004-002 Intermediate Russian II Maria M. Alley MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-11:30 AM
A continuation of RUSS003. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. M <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 004-401 Intermediate Russian II Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of RUSS003. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS504401 M <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 009-401 Central and Eastern Europe: Cultures, Histories, Societies Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region its cultures, histories, and societies from the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and sub-regions, such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through an individual research paper and class presentations. COML010401, EEUR010401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 049-401 The Soviet Cent 1917-91 Benjamin Nathans MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Out of an obscure, backward empire, the Soviet Union emerged to become the great political laboratory of the twentieth century. This course will trace the roots of the world's first socialist society and its attempts to recast human relations and human nature itself. Topics include the origins of the Revolution of 1917, the role of ideology in state policy and everyday life, the Soviet Union as the center of world communism, the challenge of ethnic diversity, and the reasons for the USSR's sudden implosion in 1991. Focusing on politics, society, culture, and their interaction, we will examine the rulers (from Lenin to Gorbachev) as well as the ruled (peasants, workers, and intellectuals; Russians and non-Russians). The course will feature discussions of selected texts, including primary sources in translation. HIST049401 H <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019A&course=RUSS049401
RUSS 105-001 Accelerated Elem Russian Maria M. Alley MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
TWO IN ONE: This is an intensive two-credit course covering two semesters of the first-year sequence (RUSS001 and 002). The course is designed for students with no background in Russian and develops language competence in speaking, reading, writing and understanding contemporary Russian. Class work emphasizes development of communication skills and cultural awareness. Together with RUSS003 and 004 fulfills Penn Language Requirement. I
RUSS 113-401 Portraits of Old Russia: Myth, Icon, Chronicle Julia Verkholantsev MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course covers eight centuries of Russias cultural, political, and social history, from its origins through the eighteenth century, a period which laid the foundation for the Russian Empire. Each week-long unit is organized around a set of texts (literary text, historical document, image, film) which examine prominent historical and legendary figures as they represent chapters in Russias history. Historical figures under examination include, among others, the Baptizer of Rus, Prince Vladimir; the nation-builder, Prince Alexander Nevsky; the first Russian Tsar, Ivan the Terrible; the first Emperor and Westernizer, Peter the Great; the renowned icon painter Andrei Rublev; the epic hero Ilya Muromets; and the founder of Muscovite monasticism, St. Sergius of Radonezh. Three modern-day nation-states Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus share and dispute the cultural heritage of Old Rus, and their political relationships even today revolve around interpretations of the past. This constructed past has a continuing influence in modern Russia and is keenly referenced, sometimes manipulatively, in contemporary social and political discourse. (Recently, for example, President Putin has justified the annexation of Crimea to Russia by referring to it as the holy site of Prince Vladimirs baptism, from which Russian Christianity ostensibly originates.) The study of pre-modern cultural and political history explains many aspects of modern Russian society, as well as certain political aspirations of its leaders. COML131401, HIST045401, RUSS613401 H <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019A&course=RUSS113401
RUSS 136-401 Portraits of Russian Society: Art, Fiction, Drama D. Brian Kim TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course covers 19C Russian cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a single medium-length text (novella, play, memoir) which opens up a single scene of social historybirth, death, duel, courtship, tsar, and so on. Each of these main texts is accompanied by a set of supplementary materialspaintings, historical readings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. The object of the course is to understand the social codes and rituals that informed nineteenth-century Russian life, and to apply this knowledge in interpreting literary texts, other cultural objects, and even historical and social documents (letters, memoranda, etc.). We will attempt to understand social history and literary interpretation as separate disciplinesyet also as disciplines that can inform one another. In short: we will read the social history through the text, and read the text against the social history. HIST047401 O <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span>
RUSS 155-001 Masterpieces 20c Rus Lit Kevin M.F. Platt TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Major Russian writers in English translation: Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Babel, Solzhenitsyn, and others. A <span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 159-401 Population and Public Health in Eastern Europe Kristen R. Ghodsee TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English. ANTH159401, EEUR159401, SOCI159401
RUSS 165-401 Russian & East European Film After World War II Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM The purpose of this course is to present the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema in terms of film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and social and political reflex. We discuss major themes and issues such as means of visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state in Russia and its subsequent installation in Eastern Europe after World War II. CIMS165401, EEUR165401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 197-401 Madness and Madmen in Russian Culture Molly Peeney MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Is "insanity" today the same thing as "madness" of old? Who gets to define what it means to be "sane," and why? Are the causes of madness biological or social? In this course, we will grapple with these and similar questions while exploring Russia's fascinating history of madness as a means to maintain, critique, or subvert the status quo. We will consider the concept of madness in Russian culture beginning with its earliest folkloric roots and trace its depiction and function in the figure of the Russian "holy fool," in classical literature, and in contemporary film. Readings will include works by many Russian greats, such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov and Nabokov. COML197401 O <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Humanities & Social Science Sector</span>
RUSS 202-401 Tolstoy D. Brian Kim TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Few authors have ever been able to combine their moral and artistic visions as closely as Tolstoy. Over the course of the semester, we will plot how Tolstoy's ethical concerns changed over the course of his life and how this was reflected in works, which include some of the greatest prose ever written. We will begin by surveying the majestic and far-reaching world of his novels and end with some of Tolstoy's short later works that correspond with the ascent of "Tolstoyism" as virtually its own religion. COML204401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Benjamin Franklin Seminars</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">All Readings and Lectures in English</span>
RUSS 217-401 Russian Politics Rudra Sil MW 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a brief discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the Putin and post-Putin era. PSCI517401, PSCI217401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Registration also required for Recitation (see below)</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019A&course=RUSS217401
RUSS 312-401 Advanced Conv/Comp II Molly Peeney TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS512401 Q <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 361-001 Russ Heritage Speakers 2 Vladimir Sviridov MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is a continuation of RUSS360. In some cases, students who did not take RUSS360 but have basic reading and writing skills may be permitted to enroll with the instructor's permission. Students who complete RUSS361 with a passing grade will satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. M <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 361-002 Russ Heritage Speakers 2 Djamilia Nazyrova MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course is a continuation of RUSS360. In some cases, students who did not take RUSS360 but have basic reading and writing skills may be permitted to enroll with the instructor's permission. Students who complete RUSS361 with a passing grade will satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. M <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 401-301 Russ Culture Through Art & Architecture: From Fin De Siecle To Perestroika Djamilia Nazyrova TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM This course offers a general introduction to the history of Russian visual art and material culture. It surveys styles, traditions, and fashions in Russian visual culture from the Middle Ages to Perestroika, considering them in the context of Russian social and political history. The course examines the very important role played by visual art in the history of Russian culture, and seeks to arrive at a deeper understanding of the relationship between visual media and key aspects and events of Russian civilization, such as Orthodoxy, Westernization and Nationalism, Communist utopia and political protest. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 430-640 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film Vladislav T. Todorov M 05:00 PM-08:00 PM This course studies the cinematic representation of civil wars, ethnic conflicts, nationalistic doctrines, and genocidal policies. The focus is on the violent developments that took place in Russia and on the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and were conditioned by the new geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had already created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing the Eastern, as well as the Western perspective. The films include masterpieces such as "Time of the Gypsies", "Underground", "Prisoner of the Mountains", "Before the Rain", "Behind Enemy Lines", and others. EEUR430640, CIMS430640
RUSS 460-001 Post-Sov Russia in Film Maria V. Bourlatskaya TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to improve their capabilities in formal and professional uses of the Russian language. Film is arguably the most powerful medium for reflecting changes in modern society. This course will examine Russia's transition to democracy and market economy through the eyes of its most creative and controversial cinematographers. The course will focus on the often agonizing process of changing values and attitudes as the country moves from Soviet to Post-Soviet society. Russian films with English subtitles will be supplemented by readings from contemporary Russian media sources. The course provides an excellent visual introduction to the problems of contemporary Russia society. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 502-401 Elementary Russian II Djamilia Nazyrova MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Continuation of RUSS501. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS002401 I <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 504-401 Intermediate Russian II Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of RUSS503. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS004401 M <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Prior Language Experience Required</span>
RUSS 512-401 Advanced Conv/Comp II Molly Peeney TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS312401 Q <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span>
RUSS 613-401 Portraits of Old Russia Julia Verkholantsev MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM COML131401, HIST045401, RUSS113401 <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Instructor</span> https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2019A&course=RUSS613401
SLAV 391-680 Serbo-Croatian II Neda Scepanovic-Uliano TR 06:30 PM-08:30 PM
SLAV 502-680 Elementary Polish II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM This course is a continuation of the SLAV501 680. This is for students who want to acquire the linguistic skills necessary for communication in everyday situations and that would constitute a solid base for further study of the Polish language. In addition students will become acquainted with various aspects of Polish culture (including Polish films), history and contemporary affairs. Students will learn through classroom exercises based on a modern textbook, completion of individual and group assignments and work with various audio and video materials. The textbook Hurra - Po Polsku 1 is written in the spirit of the communicative approach, which makes it possible to communicate from the very beginning of the learning process. The special attention, however, will be paid on systematic development of all language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. I
SLAV 506-680 Polish/Heritage Speak II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Continuation of SLAV505 M
SLAV 591-680 Elementary Ukrainian II Leo D. Rudnytzky MW 03:00 PM-05:00 PM Continuation of SLAV 590. During the second semester, the students The grammar part of the course will be mostly focused on the Ukrainian nouns and the cases, students will learn and practice each case in the context of the real-life situations. In addition, students will become acquainted with various aspects of Ukrainian culture and traditions with the special focus on the festive customs (i.e. Christmas and Easter culture in Ukraine). The course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing) and is a solid foundation for learning Ukrainian in future. I
SLAV 593-680 Intermed Ukrainian II Leo D. Rudnytzky MW 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This second-semester intermediate-level Ukrainian language is the continuation of the SLAV 592. Students will be able to practice reading, listening, writing and speaking Ukrainian more in the context of Ukrainian history politics, and culture. Students will be provided with the newspapers in Ukrainian and other authentic materials that will be the basis of both the classroom discussions and homework. M
SLAV 595-680 Advanced Ukrainian II Leo D. Rudnytzky M 05:30 PM-07:30 PM Continuation of SLAV 594. The course focuses on all the language skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) on the level with the use of the authentic materials mostly from Ukrainian literature and newspapers. Students will work on reading one of the modern Ukrainian plays to be able to perform it at the end of the course. This course is a good foundation for doing the research in Ukrainian or working or studying in Ukraine. Q <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Penn Language Center Permission Needed</span>