Courses for Spring 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
EEUR 122-680 Elementary Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 07:30 PM-09:30 PM Continuation of EEUR121. The second semester of elementary Hungarian course continues on providing functional language competency in basic grammar, vocabulary, comprehension, reading, writing and speaking in Hungarian. Students will continue to learn communicating in everyday life situations as well as in organizing a trip to Hungary, staying in a hotel, ordering meals, buying goods, and participating in cultural activities by using authentic Hungarian online resources and interactive class activities. Offered through Penn Language Center.
EEUR 124-680 Intermed Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 04:00 PM-05:30 PM The intermediate Hungarian II course continues EEUR123. Class documents and activities enable students to develop functional intermediate Hungarian competency by exploring Hungary and its culture, reading authentic online news sources, practicing listening and comprehension skills via video and audio material, researching cultural events and traditions, and exploring Hungarians' everyday lives. At the end of the semester, students will be able to participate and pass their Oral Competency Exit Interview on intermediate level and discuss topics, such as student life, family, friends, academic and student life activities/interests, travel, shopping, and cultural events. Offered through Penn Language Center.
EEUR 124-681 Intermed Hungarian II Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 05:30 PM-07:00 PM The intermediate Hungarian II course continues EEUR123. Class documents and activities enable students to develop functional intermediate Hungarian competency by exploring Hungary and its culture, reading authentic online news sources, practicing listening and comprehension skills via video and audio material, researching cultural events and traditions, and exploring Hungarians' everyday lives. At the end of the semester, students will be able to participate and pass their Oral Competency Exit Interview on intermediate level and discuss topics, such as student life, family, friends, academic and student life activities/interests, travel, shopping, and cultural events. Offered through Penn Language Center.
REES 010-401 Central & Eastern Europe: Cultures, Histories, Societies Kristen R Ghodsee TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The reappearance of the concept of Central and Eastern Europe is one of the most fascinating results of the collapse of the Soviet empire. The course will provide an introduction into the study of this region - its cultures, histories, and societies - from the foundation of the Holy Roman Empire to the enlargement of the European Union. Students are encouraged to delve deeper into particular countries, disciplines, and sub-regions, such as Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Balkans, through an individual research paper and class presentations. Prerequisite: This course is one of two required core courses for the Russian and East European Studies (REES) major. COML010401 All Readings and Lectures in English https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=REES010401
REES 133-401 Socialism Mitchell Orenstein TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM Socialism has become a hot topic in US politics. Some advocate it as an ideology that supports economic equality; others decry it as a path towards excessive state control. But what does the word socialism really mean? Why does it seem to mean different things to different people? What is the historical background of socialism? Are there meaningful differences between different forms of socialism or are they more or less the same thing? Which societies are socialist in practice, both past and present? What about the US? What are the different proposals US and other Socialists make today? What is their logic? How socialist are they? Are their policy ideas or bad? What effects would they have? This course will introduce students to socialism in theory and practice, with an emphasis on different models of Western social democracy and how they are impacting political discourse right now. PSCI112401 All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 136-401 Portraits of Russian Society: Art, Fiction, Drama D. Brian Kim TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course covers 19C Russian cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a single medium-length text (novella, play, memoir) which opens up a single scene of social historybirth, death, duel, courtship, tsar, and so on. Each of these main texts is accompanied by a set of supplementary materialspaintings, historical readings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. The object of the course is to understand the social codes and rituals that informed nineteenth-century Russian life, and to apply this knowledge in interpreting literary texts, other cultural objects, and even historical and social documents (letters, memoranda, etc.). We will attempt to understand social history and literary interpretation as separate disciplinesyet also as disciplines that can inform one another. In short: we will read the social history through the text, and read the text against the social history. HIST047401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) All Readings and Lectures in English
Humanities & Social Science Sector
REES 155-001 Masterpieces of 20th Century Russian Literature Kevin M.F. Platt TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM "Only in Russia is poetry respected. They kill you for it," famously quipped the poet Osip Mandelstam, who died in Joseph Stalin's concentration camps. Russia is a society that takes literature seriously--one in which the pen is assumed to have direct historical consequences. In this course, we will study how twentieth century Russian literature actively participated in war, revolution, totalitarian dictatorship, and resistance. The masterworks we will study open windows into worlds of revolutionary rapture, moral uplift in the face of tyranny, courageous subversion of the repressive state, and historical reflection on its failures. Our readings will range from an avant-garde play intended to rewire your mind, to an epic representation of revolutionary social transformation, to surreal and absurdist representations of a world gone mad. In other words: fasten your seatbelts low and tight across your waist; turbulence ahead! Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 159-401 Population and Public Health in Eastern Europe Kristen R Ghodsee TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English. ANTH159401, SOCI159401 All Readings and Lectures in English https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=REES159401
REES 165-401 Russian and East European Film After World War II Vladislav T. Todorov MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM The purpose of this course is to present the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema in terms of film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and social and political reflex. We discuss major themes and issues such as means of visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state in Russia and its subsequent installation in Eastern Europe after World War II. CIMS165401 All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 189-001 Soviet & Post-Sov Econ Alexander Vekker TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The course will cover the development and operation of the Soviet centrally planned economy--one of the grandest social experiments of the 20th century. We will review the mechanisms of plan creation, the push for the collectivization and further development of Soviet agriculture, the role of the Soviet educational system and the performance of labor markets (including forced labor camps--GULags). We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Soviet system and the causes of its collapse. Privatization, called by some "piratization," will be one of the central issues in our consideration of the transition from central planning to a market economy in the early 1990s. Even though our main focus will be on the Soviet economy and post-Soviet transition, we will occasionally look back in time to the tsarist era and even further back to find evidence to help explain Soviet/Russian economic development. All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 202-401 Tolstoy D. Brian Kim TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Few authors have ever been able to combine their moral and artistic visions as closely as Tolstoy. Over the course of the semester, we will plot how Tolstoy's ethical concerns changed over the course of his life and how this was reflected in works, which include some of the greatest prose ever written. We will begin by surveying the majestic and far-reaching world of his novels and end with some of Tolstoy's short later works that correspond with the ascent of "Tolstoyism" as virtually its own religion. COML204401 Benjamin Franklin Seminars
All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 217-401 Russian Politics Rudra Sil MW 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course will present an in-depth examination of political, economic and social change in post-Soviet Russia within a historical context. After a brief discussion of contemporary problems in Russia, the first half of the course will delve into the rise of communism in 1917, the evolution of the Soviet regime, and the tensions between ideology and practice over the seventy years of communist rule up until 1985. The second part of the course will begin with an examination of the Gorbachev period and the competing interpretations of how the events between 1985 and 1991 may have contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union. We will then proceed to make sense of the continuities and changes in politics, economics and society in contemporary Russia. Important topics will include the confrontations accompanying the adoption of a new constitution, the emergence of competing ideologies and parties, the struggle over economic privatization, the question of federalism and nationalism, social and political implicatons of economic reform, and prospects for Russia's future in the Putin and post-Putin era. PSCI217401, PSCI517401 Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
REES 275-401 Russian History in Film Vladislav T. Todorov MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course draws on fictional, dramatic and cinematic representations of Russian history based on Russian as well as non-Russian sources and interpretations. The analysis targets major modes of imagining, such as narrating, showing and reenacting historical events, personae and epochs justified by different, historically mutating ideological postulates and forms of national self-consciousness. Common stereotypes of picturing Russia from "foreign" perspectives draw special attention. The discussion involves the following themes and outstanding figures: the mighty autocrats Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great; the tragic ruler Boris Godunov; the brazen rebel and royal impostor Pugachev; the notorious Rasputin, his uncanny powers, sex-appeal, and court machinations; Lenin and the October Revolution; images of war; times of construction and times of collapse of the Soviet Colossus. CIMS275401 All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 410-301 Russian Folk and Literary Tale Djamilia Nazyrova TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course continues developing students' advanced skills in Russian. It focuses on the language, style, and narrative techniques of Russian tales. Course materials include written, animated, and cinematic versions of folk fairy tales, epic songs, and literary tales by major Russian authors, such as Alexander Pushkin, Nikolai Gogol, and Leo Tolstoy. The course aims to improve students' knowledge of idiomatic language and to expand their knowledge of Russian popular culture. Prerequisite: All lectures and readings in Russian. Prior Language Experience Required
REES 455-301 The Living & the Dead: the Great Patriotic War in Russ Cultural Imagination Maria Alley TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course is dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Great Patriotic War, 1941-45. Students will explore the cultural myth of the war, created in the 1960-80s. The materials will include literary texts, documentaries, photographs, and films. We will focus on three major themes of this myth: 1. moral strength and courage;2.respect for Russia's military past; and 3. the rise of national consciousness. Prior Language Experience Required
REES 501-640 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Film Vladislav T. Todorov T 06:00 PM-08:00 PM This course studies political violence, terrorism, civil wars, ethnic conflicts, and genocidal policies as represented in the social media, cable news, documentaries, feature films. We discuss various techniques and strategies of the propaganda wars, post-truth media environment, etc. The regions of interest are Former Soviet Union, Russia, the Caucasus, and the Balkans, US homegrown political violence, and the Middle East. The students are expected to develop and demonstrate a critical approach to different aspects of the cinematic, news, and social media representation of ethnic conflict. We focus on the violent developments that took place in Russia and the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc, conditioned by the geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing both, the Eastern and the Western perspective. CIMS501640 Online Course Only
Online Course Fee $150
REES 666-401 Collective Violence, Trauma, and Representation David C Kazanjian
Kevin M.F. Platt
W 06:00 PM-09:00 PM This seminar is organized as a laboratory space for graduate students and faculty working in a number of adjacent fields and problems. Seminar discussions will be led not only by the primary instructors, but also by a number of guests drawn from the Penn faculty. For the first weeks of the course, we will focus on seminal works in the interlinked areas of history and memory studies, cultural representations of collective violence, trauma studies, and other related topics. Beginning with the Xth week of the course, we will turn to case studies in a variety of geographic, cultural and historical contexts. Additionally, some later sessions of the course will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of a work in progress of a Penn graduate student, faculty member or a guest lecturer. COML683401, ENGL791401, LALS683401 For Doctoral Students Only
RUSS 002-401 Elementary Russian II Molly Peeney MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS502401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 002-680 Elementary Russian II Lada Vassilieva TR 06:00 PM-08:30 PM Continuation of RUSS001. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 004-001 Intermediate Russian II Molly Peeney MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-11:30 AM
A continuation of RUSS003. This course will further develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of everyday situations (including relationships, travel and geography, leisure activities) and also through reading and discussion of elementary facts about Russian history, excerpts from classic literature and the contemporary press and film excerpts. At the end of the course you will be able to negotiate most daily situations, to comprehend most spoken and written Russian, to state and defend your point of view. Successful completion of the course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 105-001 Accelerated Elem Russian Maria Alley MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
TWO IN ONE: This is an intensive two-credit course covering two semesters of the first-year sequence (RUSS001 and 002). The course is designed for students with no background in Russian and develops language competence in speaking, reading, writing and understanding contemporary Russian. Class work emphasizes development of communication skills and cultural awareness. Together with RUSS003 and 004 fulfills Penn Language Requirement.
RUSS 312-401 Advanced Conv/Comp II Djamilia Nazyrova TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS512401 Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 361-001 Russ Heritage Speakers 2 Djamilia Nazyrova MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is a continuation of RUSS360. In some cases, students who did not take RUSS360 but have basic reading and writing skills may be permitted to enroll with the instructor's permission. Students who complete RUSS361 with a passing grade will satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 502-401 Elementary Russian II Molly Peeney MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Continuation of RUSS501. Further work developing basic language skills using exciting authentic materials about life in present-day Russia. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to negotiate most basic communication needs in Russia (getting around town, ordering a meal, buying goods and services, polite conversation about topics of interest) and to comprehend most texts and spoken material at a basic level. RUSS002401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 508-301 Adv Russian For Business Maria Bourlatskaya TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This advanced language course focuses on developing effective oral and written communication skills for working in a Russian-speaking business environment. Students will discuss major aspects of Russian business today and learn about various Russian companies using material from the current Russian business press. In addition, students will be engaged in a number of creative projects, such as business negotiation simulations, and simulation of creating a company in Russia. Prerequisite: At lease one RUSS 400-level course or comparable language competence. Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 512-401 Advanced Conv/Comp II Djamilia Nazyrova TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Primary emphasis on speaking, writing, and listening. Development of advanced conversational skills needed to carry a discussion or to deliver a complex narrative. This course will be based on a wide variety of topics from everyday life to the discussion of political and cultural events. Russian culture and history surveyed briefly. Materials include Russian TV broadcast, newspapers, Internet, selected short stories by contemporary Russian writers. Offered each spring. RUSS312401 Permission Needed From Department
SLAV 390-680 Serbo-Croat-Bosnian I TR 06:30 PM-08:30 PM The course level is basic, starting with the alphabet (both versions of it, the Latin and the Cyrillic), moving on to the grammar basics, then some communication and other forms of interaction.
SLAV 502-680 Elementary Polish II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 06:30 PM-08:30 PM This course is a continuation of the SLAV501. This is for students who want to acquire the linguistic skills necessary for communication in everyday situations and that would constitute a solid base for further study of the Polish language. In addition students will become acquainted with various aspects of Polish culture (including Polish films), history and contemporary affairs. Students will learn through classroom exercises based on a modern textbook, completion of individual and group assignments and work with various audio and video materials. The textbook Hurra - Po Polsku 1 is written in the spirit of the communicative approach, which makes it possible to communicate from the very beginning of the learning process. The special attention, however, will be paid on systematic development of all language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing.
SLAV 506-680 Polish/Heritage Speak II Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Continuation of SLAV505
SLAV 590-680 Elementary Ukrainian MW 06:00 PM-08:00 PM An introduction to the fundamentals of the Ukrainian language, acquisition of conversational, reading and writing skills. This course is designed for students who have no or little background in studying Ukrainian. Students will be able to develop the base for the further study of the Ukrainian language. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Ukrainian language and culture for those who would like to speak Ukrainian or use the language for reading and research. The course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing).
SLAV 591-680 Elementary Ukrainian II Continuation of SLAV 590. During the second semester, the students The grammar part of the course will be mostly focused on the Ukrainian nouns and the cases, students will learn and practice each case in the context of the real-life situations. In addition, students will become acquainted with various aspects of Ukrainian culture and traditions with the special focus on the festive customs (i.e. Christmas and Easter culture in Ukraine). The course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing) and is a solid foundation for learning Ukrainian in future.
SLAV 592-680 Intermed Ukrainian I MW 04:30 PM-06:00 PM This is a first-semester intermediate-level Ukrainian language course which is designed to make students practice reading, speaking and writing in Ukrainian. Current issues of Ukrainian newspapers, especially the weekly , will serve as the basic source for the study of the contemporary Ukrainian idiom. Reading, translation and discussion of featured articles on such topics as business, education, politics, science, sports et al. including advertising and horoscope style and terminology will not only be used to hone the language skills and build up vocabulary but also to acquaint the student with the latest linguistic developments in Ukraine, such as the loan-words and loan-translations, abbreviations and acronyms, ancient folk proverbs and sayings as well as contemporary technical terms.
SLAV 593-680 Intermed Ukrainian II This second-semester intermediate-level Ukrainian language is the continuation of the SLAV 592. Students will be able to practice reading, listening, writing and speaking Ukrainian more in the context of Ukrainian history politics, and culture. Students will be provided with the newspapers in Ukrainian and other authentic materials that will be the basis of both the classroom discussions and homework.