Courses for Fall 2021

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
CZCH 110-680 Czech Through Film Abigail Weil MW 05:15 PM-07:15 PM This course has two separate but related components: a series of Czech films, shown with subtitles and open to the entire University of Pennsylvania community, and a Czech language class which relies on the films for content. Each film screening will be preceded by introductory remarks and followed by a discussion, with optional reading material made available in advance. In this way, the film series can but need not also be offered as a for-credit course, cross-listed through REES and Cinema and Media Studies. The films will be sequenced chronologically through Czech history, as opposed to film history, so that the series will double as a survey of Czech history. For example, we will begin with films set in the medieval period, such as Marketa Lazarova (dir. Frantisek Vlacil, 1967) and Cisaruv pekar-Pekaruv cisar (Emperor's Baker-Baker's Emperor, dir. Martin Fric, 1955). Eventually we will progress to recent films that deal with the current moment. Classic and contemporary films will be intermingled to simultaneously present a variety of important historical eras and cinematic techniques. Concurrently, students enrolled in the language course will learn basic Czech using custom-made materials drawn from the films. As their vocabulary and grasp of grammatical concepts increases, we will be able to work with longer and more complex sections of the film-texts. The films will provide the material for listening and reading exercises, and the students' oral and written work will be anchored by their responses to the films. We will advance from picking out simple statements to analyzing dialogue and identifying irony in film and composition, developing skills of intercultural communication and competence. By the end of the course, students will be able to read about Czech cinema using authentic materials, and discuss the films' aesthetic, historical and political importance.
HUNG 121-680 Elementary Hungarian I Adrienn V. Mizsei TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM The elementary Hungarian I course focuses on providing reading, writing, listening and reading-comprehension skills on basic level Hungarian. Interactive class activities and authentic Hungarian material will enable students to develop language skills so they could talk about themselves and their families, discuss every day and weekend routines, express likes and dislikes, converse about school and family activities, and get acquainted with Hungarian holidays and cultural traditions. Prerequisite: Offered through Penn Language Center.
HUNG 123-680 Intermediate Hungarian I Adrienn V. Mizsei MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM The Intermediate Hungarian I course builds on and continues the course material in Elementary Hungarian I-II. Course activities, authentic audio and video material along with Hungarian online resources will enable students to further develop their reading, writing, listening comprehension and conversational skills. Students will practice their skills by discussing and writing about their interests, student lives, travel and cultural experiences, life on campus as well as learning about Hungarian seasonal traditions, cultural events, and Hungarian student life. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required
HUNG 123-681 Intermediate Hungarian I Adrienn V. Mizsei MW 07:00 PM-08:30 PM The Intermediate Hungarian I course builds on and continues the course material in Elementary Hungarian I-II. Course activities, authentic audio and video material along with Hungarian online resources will enable students to further develop their reading, writing, listening comprehension and conversational skills. Students will practice their skills by discussing and writing about their interests, student lives, travel and cultural experiences, life on campus as well as learning about Hungarian seasonal traditions, cultural events, and Hungarian student life. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required
PLSH 501-680 Elementary Polish I Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 07:00 PM-09:00 PM This course is for students who want to acquire the linguistic skills necessary for communication in everyday situations and that would constitute a solid base for further study of the Polish language. In addition students will become acquainted with various aspects of Polish culture (including Polish films), history and contemporary affairs. Students will learn through classroom exercises based on a modern textbook, completion of individual and group assignments and work with various audio and video materials. The textbook Hurra - Po Polsku 1 is written in the spirit of the communicative approach, which makes it possible to communicate from the very beginning of the learning process. The special attention, however, will be paid on systematic development of all language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center.
PLSH 503-680 Intermediate Polish I Agnieszka Dziedzic CANCELED This is a first-semester intermediate -level language course that emphasizes the development of the four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) within a culturally based context. Class time will focus on communicative activities that combine grammatical concepts, relevant vocabulary, and cultural themes. Students will learn through classroom exercises based on a modern textbook: Hurra Po Polsku 2, completion of individual and group assignments and work with various audio and video materials. Major course goals include: the acquisition of intermediate-level vocabulary, the controlled use of the Polish cases; the aspect of the verbs, the development of writing skills. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required
PLSH 505-680 Polish/Heritage Speak I Agnieszka Dziedzic MW 05:15 PM-07:00 PM The course is addressed to students who have spoken Polish at home and seek to achieve proficiency in the language. The main goal of this course is to provide instruction directed at students continued development of existing competencies in the Polish language. Students will acquire skills that range from learning grammar and spelling, and developing vocabulary, to interpretation and analysis of different literary genres. Students will explore a broad variety of cultural themes. Topics will include: Polish. Upon completion of the Polish for Heritage Speakers course, students are expected to confidently understand, read, write and speak Polish with an increased vocabulary and a better command of Polish grammar. They will increase their reading skills through interpretation and analysis of different Polish literary genres. Students will be able to organize their thoughts and write in a coherent manner. They will increase their writing skills by writing personal essays, compositions and others. Students will further their knowledge of the Polish language and will engage in class discussion on various topics. Students will gain a better understanding of the Polish culture. Instructor permission required to enroll. Prior Language Experience Required
REES 134-401 Communism Mitchell Orenstein TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism. PSCI144401, REES634401 Society sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
REES 135-401 Cold War: Global History Benjamin Nathans MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The Cold War was more than simply a military confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union; it was the frame within which the entire world developed (for better or worse) for nearly five decades. This course will examine the cold War as a global phenomenon, covering not only the military and diplomatic history of the period, but also examining the social and cultural impact of the superpower confrontation. We will cover the origins of the conflict, the interplay between periods of tension and detente, the relative significance of disagreements within the opposing blocs, and the relationship between the "center" of the conflict in the North Atlantic/European area and the global "periphery". HIST135401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES135401
REES 145-401 Masterpieces 19c Rus Lit Aleksey Berg TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM A bronze monument to an all-powerful emperor comes to life and pursues a poor everyman through the streets, driving him to his death. A studious young man kills an old woman as a philosophical experiment. A young woman at the height of aristocratic society abandons her husband and young son to devote herself to her lover. These and other tales from the classics of nineteenth-century Russian literature will touch and delight you, get under your skin, and even attempt to show you how to live. We will read these tales in order to understand how books can become events in their own right, how Russian literature gained such power and prestige, and what it can still teach us today. Authors include Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Pavlova, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. REES645401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 164-401 Russian Film 1900-1945 Vladislav T. Todorov MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The purpose of this course is to present the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema in terms of film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and social and political reflex. We discuss major themes and issues such as the invention of montage, the means of revolutionary visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology, and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state in Soviet Russia before World War II. CIMS164401, REES664401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES164401
REES 187-401 Portraits of Soviet Society: Literature, Film, Drama Siarhei Biareishyk WF 10:15 AM-11:45 AM How can art and literature open a window on Russian lives lived over the course of the tumultuous twentieth century? This course adopts a unique approach to questions of cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a medium-length film, text or set of texts by some of the most important cultural figures of the era (novella, play, memoir, film, short stories) which opens up a single scene of social history: work, village, avant-garde, war, Gulag, and so on. Each cultural work is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials: historical readings, paintings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. We will read social history through culture and culture through history. Prerequisite: All readings and lectures in English. HIST046401, REES687401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
REES 189-401 Soviet & Post-Sov Econ Alexander Vekker TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The course will cover the development and operation of the Soviet centrally planned economy--one of the grandest social experiments of the 20th century. We will review the mechanisms of plan creation, the push for the collectivization and further development of Soviet agriculture, the role of the Soviet educational system and the performance of labor markets (including forced labor camps--GULags). We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Soviet system and the causes of its collapse. Privatization, called by some "piratization," will be one of the central issues in our consideration of the transition from central planning to a market economy in the early 1990s. Even though our main focus will be on the Soviet economy and post-Soviet transition, we will occasionally look back in time to the tsarist era and even further back to find evidence to help explain Soviet/Russian economic development. REES689401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
REES 191-401 Putin's Russia Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Winston Churchill famously said that Russia "is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. Strikingly, today many informed Russians would agree: no one can provide definitive answers concerning what has driven Russian public life and politics over the past three years, as it ricochetted from the mass protests of 2011 and 2012, into the Pussy Riot scandal, then the Olympics, and most recently to the intense patriotism driving the Russian annexation of Crimea and intervention in Ukraine. In this course we will examine how Russians themselves communicate about and represent Russia and what this reveals about this complex society and its development. We will consider print journalism, novels, films, televised media, and the internetpaying close attention both to particular representations and to social institutions for their production, dissemination and consumption. Topics of special concern will include: conspiracy theories, representations of Russian history, collective identity and patriotism, intellectuals and elites, gender and sexuality, consumption and wealth. Putins Russia is an introductory level course for which no prior knowledge Russian history, culture or society is required. All readings and screenings will be in English. Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Russian is required. REES691401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Humanities & Social Science Sector
REES 197-401 Madness & Madmen Molly Peeney MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Is "insanity" today the same thing as "madness" of old? Who gets to define what it means to be "sane," and why? Are the causes of madness biological or social? In this course, we will grapple with these and similar questions while exploring Russia's fascinating history of madness as a means to maintain, critique, or subvert the status quo. We will consider the concept of madness in Russian culture beginning with its earliest folkloric roots and trace its depiction and function in the figure of the Russian "holy fool," in classical literature, and in contemporary film. Readings will include works by many Russian greats, such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov and Nabokov. COML197401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
Humanities & Social Science Sector
REES 201-401 Dostoevsky Aleksey Berg TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course explores the ways Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) portrays the "inner world(s)" of his characters. Dostoevsky's psychological method will be considered against the historical, ideological, and literary contexts of middle to late nineteenth-century Russia. The course consists of three parts External World (the contexts of Dostoevsky), "Inside" Dostoevsky's World (the author's technique and ideas) and The World of Text (close reading of Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov). Students will write three essays on various aspects of Dostoevsky's "spiritual realism." COML207401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
All Readings and Lectures in English
REES 413-401 20c Russ Lit,Film & Cult Maria Bourlatskaya TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course continues developing students' advanced skills in Russian, and introduces students to major movements and figures of twentieth-century Russian literature and culture. We will read the works of modern Russian writers, and watch and discuss feature films. The course will introduce the first Soviet films and works of the poets of the Silver Age and beginning of the Soviet era as well as the works from later periods up to the Perestroika and Glasnost periods (the late 1980s). Prerequisite: All lectures and readings in Russian. REES513401 Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES413401
REES 430-401 Ethnic Conflict in Film Vladislav T. Todorov MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course studies the cinematic representation of civil wars, ethnic conflicts, nationalistic doctrines, and genocidal policies. The focus is on the violent developments that took place in Russia and on the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and were conditioned by the new geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had already created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing the Eastern, as well as the Western perspective. The films include masterpieces such as "Time of the Gypsies", "Underground", "Prisoner of the Mountains", "Before the Rain", "Behind Enemy Lines", and others. CIMS430401, REES630401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES430401
REES 456-401 Fear and Loathing of Capitalism in Russian Literature of the 19th Century Djamilia Nazyrova MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course is a content-based course intended for students who speak Russian at home and seek to improve their command of formal and professional registers of the Russian language. Free trade and market relations were slowly developing in the 19th century Russia, rising against the inhibiting influence exerted by the institution of slavery and rigid social hierarchy. Russian classical realist literature is known for its fierce attacks on capitalism and capitalist values through literary characters and conflicts that prominently feature money and private property. Despite all their philosophical and ideological differences, great Russian writers signal their inherent opposition to capitalist mode of production and remain indifferent to liberal values and creative potential associated with capitalist competition. In this course we will explore what was the cultural and historical context for that palpable fear of capitalism and loathing of bourgeois values, and what was it in free market relations that scared so much all the grand authors of Russian 19th century canon. We will examine these questions through reading and analyzing the works of such authors as Pushkin, Turgenev, Ostrovsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. REES556401 Prior Language Experience Required https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES456401
REES 502-001 Intro To Russian & East European Studies I: Social Science Approaches Mitchell Orenstein TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This graduate level seminar provides an introduction to social science approaches to the study of the Eastern half of Europe and Eurasia, including Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, the successor states of Yugoslavia as well as the successor states of the former Soviet Union. Through a selection of articles and essays written by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, demographers, political scientists, and economists, students will explore how social scientific methodologies have been used to understand modern and contemporary society, politics, cultures, and economies of this region from the rise of nationalism in the 19th century to the current day. All readings and assignments in English.
REES 504-401 Geopolitics of Energy in Russia and Eurasia Anna Beta Mikulska TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Russia is one of the major players in the international energy market: third largest oil producer after the U.S. and Saudi Arabia and second-largest (after the U.S.) natural gas producers (2019). It is also a top coal and nuclear power producer. But the geopolitical might that the country holds with respect to energy markets stems not as much from how much energy it produces as from how much energy it exports. Today Russia leads global natural gas exports and trails only the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in oil exports. Russia is also reliably one of the top coal-exporting countries. This class will explore the geopolitics of energy focusing on the role of Russia as a leading global energy supplier. In doing so, it hopes to provide a slightly different understanding of global energy that is usually taught from either the U.S. or OPEC angle. ENMG508401
REES 513-401 20c Russ Lit,Film & Cult Maria Bourlatskaya TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course continues developing students' advanced skills in Russian, and introduces students to major movements and figures of twentieth-century Russian literature and culture. We will read the works of modern Russian writers, and watch and discuss feature films. The course will introduce the first Soviet films and works of the poets of the Silver Age and beginning of the Soviet era as well as the works from later periods up to the Perestroika and Glasnost periods (the late 1980s). Prerequisite: All lectures and readings in Russian. REES413401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES513401
REES 555-640 Terrorism Vladislav T. Todorov T 05:15 PM-07:15 PM This course studies the emergence of organized terrorism in nineteenth-century Russia and its impact on public life in the West, the Balkans, and America. We investigate the political and cultural origins of terrorism, its conspiratorial routine, structures, methods, manuals, and manifestoes. Historical and cultural approaches converge in the discussion of intellectual movements that forged the formula of terrorism and influenced the professionalization of the underground, such as nihilism, anarchism, and populism. We discuss the stern terrorist personality, self-denial, revolutionary martyrdom, and conspiratorial militancy. The theatricals of terrorism are of particular interest, its bombastic acts, mystification, and techniques of spreading disorganizing fear in the global media environment. We trace the creation of counterterrorism police in late imperial Russia and its methods to infiltrate, demoralize, and dismantle the terrorist networks, and reengineer their social base. First Red Scare and the formation of the FBI constitutes a unique case of managing rampant political violence and countering the asymmetrical threat of terrorism. CIMS555640 Undergraduates Need Permission
Course Online: Synchronous Format
Online Course Fee $150
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES555640
REES 556-401 Fear and Loathing of Capitalism in Russian Literature of the 19th Century Djamilia Nazyrova MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course is a content-based course intended for students who speak Russian at home and seek to improve their command of formal and professional registers of the Russian language. Free trade and market relations were slowly developing in the 19th century Russia, rising against the inhibiting influence exerted by the institution of slavery and rigid social hierarchy. Russian classical realist literature is known for its fierce attacks on capitalism and capitalist values through literary characters and conflicts that prominently feature money and private property. Despite all their philosophical and ideological differences, great Russian writers signal their inherent opposition to capitalist mode of production and remain indifferent to liberal values and creative potential associated with capitalist competition. In this course we will explore what was the cultural and historical context for that palpable fear of capitalism and loathing of bourgeois values, and what was it in free market relations that scared so much all the grand authors of Russian 19th century canon. We will examine these questions through reading and analyzing the works of such authors as Pushkin, Turgenev, Ostrovsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. REES456401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES556401
REES 630-401 Ethnic Conflict in Film Vladislav T. Todorov MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course studies the cinematic representation of civil wars, ethnic conflicts, nationalistic doctrines, and genocidal policies. The focus is on the violent developments that took place in Russia and on the Balkans after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and were conditioned by the new geopolitical dynamics that the fall of communism had already created. We study media broadcasts, documentaries, feature films representing the Eastern, as well as the Western perspective. The films include masterpieces such as "Time of the Gypsies", "Underground", "Prisoner of the Mountains", "Before the Rain", "Behind Enemy Lines", and others. REES430401, CIMS430401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES630401
REES 634-401 Communism Mitchell Orenstein TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism. PSCI144401, REES134401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
REES 645-401 Masterpieces 19c Rus Lit Aleksey Berg TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM A bronze monument to an all-powerful emperor comes to life and pursues a poor everyman through the streets, driving him to his death. A studious young man kills an old woman as a philosophical experiment. A young woman at the height of aristocratic society abandons her husband and young son to devote herself to her lover. These and other tales from the classics of nineteenth-century Russian literature will touch and delight you, get under your skin, and even attempt to show you how to live. We will read these tales in order to understand how books can become events in their own right, how Russian literature gained such power and prestige, and what it can still teach us today. Authors include Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Pavlova, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. REES145401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
REES 649-401 Socialist and Post-Socialist Worlds Kevin M.F. Platt W 10:15 AM-01:15 PM In 1989-1991, a whole world, perhaps many worlds, vanished: the worlds of socialism. In this graduate seminar we will investigate key cultural works, theoretical constructs and contexts spanning the socialist world(s), focused around the USSR, which was for many the (not uncontested) center of the socialist cosmos. Further, we will study the cultural and political interrelationships between the socialist world(s) and anticolonial and left movements in the developing and the capitalist developed nations alike. Finally, we will investigate the aftermaths left behind as these world(s) crumbled or were transformed beyond recognition at the end of the twentieth century. Our work will be ramified by consideration of a number of critical and methodological tools for the study of these many histories and geographies. The purview of the course is dauntingly large - global in scale - and therefore "coverage" will of necessity be incomplete. In addition to the lead instructor, a number of guest instructors from Penn and from other institutions will join us to lead our investigations into specific geographies, moments and areas. Additionally, four weeks have been left without content, to be filled in via consensus decision by the members of the seminar. ENGL649401, COML649401
REES 664-401 Russian Film 1900-1945 Vladislav T. Todorov MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The purpose of this course is to present the Russian and East European contribution to world cinema in terms of film theory, experimentation with the cinematic language, and social and political reflex. We discuss major themes and issues such as the invention of montage, the means of revolutionary visual propaganda and the cinematic component to the communist cultural revolutions, party ideology, and practices of social-engineering, cinematic response to the emergence of the totalitarian state in Soviet Russia before World War II. CIMS164401, REES164401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=REES664401
REES 687-401 Portraits of Soviet Society: Literature, Film, Drama Siarhei Biareishyk WF 10:15 AM-11:45 AM How can art and literature open a window on Russian lives lived over the course of the tumultuous twentieth century? This course adopts a unique approach to questions of cultural and social history. Each week-long unit is organized around a medium-length film, text or set of texts by some of the most important cultural figures of the era (novella, play, memoir, film, short stories) which opens up a single scene of social history: work, village, avant-garde, war, Gulag, and so on. Each cultural work is accompanied by a set of supplementary materials: historical readings, paintings, cultural-analytical readings, excerpts from other literary works, etc. We will read social history through culture and culture through history. All readings and lectures in English. HIST046401, REES187401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
REES 689-401 Soviet & Post-Sov Econ Alexander Vekker TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The course will cover the development and operation of the Soviet centrally planned economy--one of the grandest social experiments of the 20th century. We will review the mechanisms of plan creation, the push for the collectivization and further development of Soviet agriculture, the role of the Soviet educational system and the performance of labor markets (including forced labor camps--GULags). We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Soviet system and the causes of its collapse. Privatization, called by some "piratization," will be one of the central issues in our consideration of the transition from central planning to a market economy in the early 1990s. Even though our main focus will be on the Soviet economy and post-Soviet transition, we will occasionally look back in time to the tsarist era and even further back to find evidence to help explain Soviet/Russian economic development. REES189401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
REES 691-401 Putin's Russia Kevin M.F. Platt TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Winston Churchill famously said that Russia "is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. Strikingly, today many informed Russians would agree: no one can provide definitive answers concerning what has driven Russian public life and politics over the past three years, as it ricochetted from the mass protests of 2011 and 2012, into the Pussy Riot scandal, then the Olympics, and most recently to the intense patriotism driving the Russian annexation of Crimea and intervention in Ukraine. In this course we will examine how Russians themselves communicate about and represent Russia and what this reveals about this complex society and its development. We will consider print journalism, novels, films, televised media, and the internetpaying close attention both to particular representations and to social institutions for their production, dissemination and consumption. Topics of special concern will include: conspiracy theories, representations of Russian history, collective identity and patriotism, intellectuals and elites, gender and sexuality, consumption and wealth. Putins Russia is an introductory level course for which no prior knowledge Russian history, culture or society is required. All readings and screenings will be in English. Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Russian is required. REES191401
RUSS 001-401 Elementary Russian I Maria Alley MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, the Internet, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read simplified literary, commercial, and other types of texts (signs, menus, short news articles, short stories) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes). RUSS501401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
RUSS 001-680 Elementary Russian I Lada Vassilieva TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, the Internet, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read simplified literary, commercial, and other types of texts (signs, menus, short news articles, short stories) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes). RUSS501680 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
RUSS 003-401 Intermediate Russian I Maria Alley MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills and their understanding of Russian culture. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS503401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 003-402 Intermediate Russian I Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills and their understanding of Russian culture. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS503402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 311-401 Advanced Russ Conv/Comp Maria Alley TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course develops students' skills in speaking and writing about topics in Russian literature, contemporary society, politics, and everyday life. Topics include women, work and family; sexuality; the economic situation; environmental problems; and life values. Materials include selected short stories by 19th and 20th century Russian authors, video-clips of interviews, excerpts from films, and articles from the Russian media. Continued work on grammar and vocabulary building. RUSS511401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 360-401 Russian For Heritage Speakers I Djamilia Nazyrova MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to achieve proficiency in the language. Topics will include an intensive introduction to the Russian writing system and grammar, focusing on exciting materials and examples drawn from classic and contemporary Russian culture and social life. Students who complete this course in combination with RUSS361 satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. Prerequisite: Previous language experience required. RUSS560401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Prior Language Experience Required
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RUSS 501-401 Elementary Russian I Maria Alley MTWRF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, the Internet, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read simplified literary, commercial, and other types of texts (signs, menus, short news articles, short stories) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes). RUSS001401
RUSS 501-680 Elementary Russian I Lada Vassilieva TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM This course develops elementary skills in reading, speaking, understanding and writing the Russian language. We will work with an exciting range of authentic written materials, the Internet, videos and recordings relating to the dynamic scene of Russia today. At the end of the course students will be comfortable with the Russian alphabet and will be able to read simplified literary, commercial, and other types of texts (signs, menus, short news articles, short stories) and participate in elementary conversations about daily life (who you are, what you do every day, where you are from, likes and dislikes). RUSS001680
RUSS 503-401 Intermediate Russian I Maria Alley MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills and their understanding of Russian culture. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS003401
RUSS 503-402 Intermediate Russian I Molly Peeney MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will develop your ability to use the Russian language in the context of typical everyday situations, including university life, family, shopping, entertainment, etc. Role-playing, skits, short readings from literature and the current press, and video clips will be used to help students improve their language skills and their understanding of Russian culture. At the end of the semester you will be able to read and write short texts about your daily schedule and interests, to understand brief newspaper articles, films and short literary texts, and to express your opinions in Russian. In combination with RUSS 004, this course prepares students to satisfy the language competency requirement. RUSS003402
RUSS 511-401 Advanced Russ Conv/Comp Maria Alley TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course develops students' skills in speaking and writing about topics in Russian literature, contemporary society, politics, and everyday life. Topics include women, work and family; sexuality; the economic situation; environmental problems; and life values. Materials include selected short stories by 19th and 20th century Russian authors, video-clips of interviews, excerpts from films, and articles from the Russian media. Continued work on grammar and vocabulary building. RUSS311401 Permission Needed From Instructor
Prior Language Experience Required
RUSS 560-401 Russian For Heritage Speakers I Djamilia Nazyrova MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course is intended for students who have spoken Russian at home and seek to achieve proficiency in the language. Topics will include an intensive introduction to the Russian writing system and grammar, focusing on exciting materials and examples drawn from classic and contemporary Russian culture and social life. Students who complete this course in combination with RUSS361 satisfy the Penn Language Requirement. Prerequisite: Previous language experience required. RUSS360401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=RUSS560401
UKRN 590-680 Elementary Ukrainian Kseniia Power TR 05:15 PM-07:15 PM An introduction to the fundamentals of the Ukrainian language, acquisition of conversational, reading and writing skills. This course is designed for students who have no or little background in studying Ukrainian. Students will be able to develop the base for the further study of the Ukrainian language. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Ukrainian language and culture for those who would like to speak Ukrainian or use the language for reading and research. The course stresses all four major communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing). Prerequisition: Offered through the Penn Language Center.
UKRN 592-680 Intermed Ukrainian I Kseniia Power TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This is a first-semester intermediate-level Ukrainian language course which is designed to make students practice reading, speaking and writing in Ukrainian. Current issues of Ukrainian newspapers, especially the weekly , will serve as the basic source for the study of the contemporary Ukrainian idiom. Reading, translation and discussion of featured articles on such topics as business, education, politics, science, sports et al. including advertising and horoscope style and terminology will not only be used to hone the language skills and build up vocabulary but also to acquaint the student with the latest linguistic developments in Ukraine, such as the loan-words and loan-translations, abbreviations and acronyms, ancient folk proverbs and sayings as well as contemporary technical terms. Prerequisite: Offered through the Penn Language Center. Prior Language Experience Required